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Roadrunner
May 11th, 2013, 09:05 AM
I just got a mini rose plant and I've always wondered how they are pollinated, because it seems like the flower is so tightly formed. So I tried to find info on the net and this is what I found: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rose


Excerpt:

"The aggregate fruit of the rose is a berry-like structure called a rose hip. Many of the domestic cultivars do not produce hips, as the flowers are so tightly petalled that they do not provide access for pollination."



Does it need to be manually pollinated?

Tom C
May 11th, 2013, 12:20 PM
Does it need to be manually pollinated?

If you are intentionally breeding rose; yes, you need to expose the working bits and paint on pollen from your intended pollinator.

If you are collecting the hips providence provides, maybe not.

If your goal is to grow seed from a hip, collect seed in the fall and plant to pots and cold-stratify seed outdoors.

Roadrunner
May 11th, 2013, 03:23 PM
I was just curious if they attract any pollinators, but after looking at how tight the waded flower and then reading the above link, I guess they don't attract pollinators.

But I planted it any way.

Roadrunner
May 11th, 2013, 03:36 PM
BTW, here are some pics of it


http://i1128.photobucket.com/albums/m484/76gunner/Mini%20Rose/035_zps7184bc6d.jpg (http://s1128.photobucket.com/user/76gunner/media/Mini%20Rose/035_zps7184bc6d.jpg.html)

http://i1128.photobucket.com/albums/m484/76gunner/Mini%20Rose/029_zpsede401cf.jpg (http://s1128.photobucket.com/user/76gunner/media/Mini%20Rose/029_zpsede401cf.jpg.html)


http://i1128.photobucket.com/albums/m484/76gunner/Mini%20Rose/031_zpsa92f7ded.jpg (http://s1128.photobucket.com/user/76gunner/media/Mini%20Rose/031_zpsa92f7ded.jpg.html)

NightMist
May 12th, 2013, 04:51 PM
I was just curious if they attract any pollinators, but after looking at how tight the waded flower and then reading the above link, I guess they don't attract pollinators.

But I planted it any way.

Sure they attract pollinators. It is just the pollinators are disappointed when they get there. Fortunately for the dear little beasties there are plenty of other flowering plants in the garden nearby.

LuvsToPlant
May 13th, 2013, 05:04 AM
Do you know the name of... it?
Can't go wrong for the beauty of a rose...Beautiful.

...Your old garden and shrub roses are good for attracting bees.

Roadrunner
May 13th, 2013, 07:54 AM
No, other than "Mini Rose". I got it from a neighbor that didn't want it, so I said I'll plant it.

I was mainly curious of what pollinators it would attract, since I've always wondered that, because of how tightly the flower is wrapped. But I'm not really a fan of roses.

NightMist
May 13th, 2013, 09:26 AM
No, other than "Mini Rose". I got it from a neighbor that didn't want it, so I said I'll plant it.

I was mainly curious of what pollinators it would attract, since I've always wondered that, because of how tightly the flower is wrapped. But I'm not really a fan of roses.

As I understand it the entire rose family, from plum trees to raspberries to florabundas are attractive to a LOT of pollinators. I know I have seen a good assortment of bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds on my roses.

It is widely believed that hybrids are less attractive to pollinators than old roses. There are also some that believe that pollinators will avoid red flowers.
The Dark Lady rose here is a deep dark red hybrid and it has never lacked pollinators. YMMV

The pollinators will not know that a flower is too tight before they get to it. Surely you have seen bees and such buzzing around unopened buds? They just move on to a flower they can get at, and I bet they come back later to see if it has opened up more.

Roadrunner
May 13th, 2013, 03:54 PM
The pollinators will not know that a flower is too tight before they get to it. Surely you have seen bees and such buzzing around unopened buds? They just move on to a flower they can get at, and I bet they come back later to see if it has opened up more.I guess I have too many flowers, because I have tons of bees out there doing their business, but still haven't seen any come around the rose.

Just because it's a flower doesn't mean it'll attract them. A good example of this is my Southern Magnolia, which bees don't mess with, despite it having a huge white flower -- beetles pollinate it.

And my big red flowers on the Hibiscus is passed up all the time by all pollinators. They fly right by it and don't even investigate.

NightMist
May 14th, 2013, 10:39 AM
I'll grant you that I haven't actually seen pollinators on the Dark Lady, but it sets hips quite vigorously so something is enjoying it.
The Damask and the now deceased Cecile Brunner (1) however have had lots and lots of very visible pollinators of assorted types. I have never believed that fragrance is what attracts the pollinators, but that damask may just be proving me wrong. It goes into bloom and all of a sudden every bumblebee, and carpenter bee in town is here, butterflies I had never even known we had locally swing by, and that shrub provided me with the first time ever seeing humming birds at a rose bush.
I'll admit I do not see very many honeybees at the roses, but I always have some second year parsley, and they just blanket that, plus they seem to be fond of the stock (evening or scented stock, however you call it).
I generally have a ton of flowers, asters to zinnia, so between them and the herbs I do not lack for pollinators. It is interesting to see what they go for though.


(1) new handicapped ramp next door resulting in a lot of salt washing downhill right over the retaining wall and onto poor Cecile who was trained along it.