Commissioner's Directive

Date:
2009-12-08

Number - Numéro:
254-1

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAM

Issued under the authority of the Assistant Commissioner, Human Resource Management

PDF


Policy Bulletin 290
Policy Bulletin 300


PURPOSES

  1. To prevent the occurrence of accidents, injuries and illnesses by promoting the establishment and maintenance of healthy and safe work conditions for employees through training programs, committees, monitoring, reporting, audits, evaluations, and corrective measures.

  2. Preventive measures should consist first of the elimination of hazards, then the reduction of hazards and finally, the provision of personal protective equipment, clothing, devices or materials, all of which will ensure the health and safety of employees.

AUTHORITIES

  1. Corrections and Conditional Release Regulations

    Financial Administration Act

    Part II of the Canada Labour Code

    Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations

    Treasury Board Occupational Health and Safety policies, publications, directives and standards

    Human Resources and Skills Development Canada publications

    Collective Agreements

    National Training Standards of the Correctional Service of Canada

CROSS-REFERENCES

  1. Commissioner's Directive 254 - Occupational Safety and Health and Return to Work Programs

    Commissioner's Directive 345 - Fire Safety

    Commissioner's Directive 573 - Control of Items Critical to the Security and Safety of Institutions

DEFINITIONS

  1. Workers' Compensation Board (or WCB): every provincial Board or Commission.

  2. Appropriate standard: a standard(s) that provides the highest level of safety to the extent that the most recent standard provides the highest level of safety.

  3. Qualified person: in respect of a specified duty, a person who, because of knowledge, training and experience, is licensed or otherwise qualified to perform that duty safely and properly.

APPLICATION

  1. All CSC employees and contract workers at the local, regional and national levels of the organization will apply the approved policies, directives, standards, guides, procedures and regulations found in the following annexes:

    • A - Approved Treasury Board Policies, Directives, Standards, Procedures, Guides, Advisory Notices and Regulations on Occupational Health and Safety
    • B - National Health and Safety Policy Committee
    • B1 - Regional Health and Safety Policy Committee
    • B2 - Workplace Health and Safety Committee
    • C - Telework
    • D - Hazardous Occurrence Investigation Report
    • E - What a Supervisor Should Do if an Accident, Illness or Near Miss Occurs
    • E1 - Response to Incidents Involving an Employee Medical Emergency - Employer Checklist
    • F - Provincial WCB Forms to be Filled Out by the Employer
    • G - Respiratory Protection in CSC
    • H - Protective Footwear

RESPONSIBILITIES

  1. CSC as the employer will exercise effective leadership at all levels of the organization in order to ensure full compliance with the requirements of Treasury Board policies, Part II of the Canada Labour Code, the Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations as well as any standards and guidelines as may be developed by the Service. Managers will encourage voluntary compliance, self-regulation and the joint resolution of problems.

  2. The National Occupational Health and Safety Advisors, Human Resource Management Sector, at National Headquarters will be responsible for:

    1. monitoring and providing direction to Regional Coordinators, managers and Workplace Health and Safety Committees on the Occupational Health and Safety Program from the national level; and
    2. developing guidelines for the regulation of specific occupational health and safety issues and for the development of National Training Standards for programs.
  3. Regional Deputy Commissioners will ensure that:

    1. appropriate resources and procedures are in place to meet the responsibilities described in this policy and any corresponding guidelines or standards;
    2. a Regional Occupational Health and Safety Coordinator is designated to facilitate the implementation of the Occupational Health and Safety Program within each region;
    3. all of their work sites adhere to accident investigation and reporting procedures outlined in Part XV of the Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations as follows:
      1. all accidents and other hazardous occurrences details will be recorded in the Health/Safety Module of the Human Resource Management System,
      2. trend analysis of the accidents, including occupational groups affected, injured body part(s), source of injury, accident site, and other relevant information, will be done by designated safety personnel in each facility on a semi-annual basis and reported to the Regional Health and Safety Policy Committees;
    4. staff at each work site are trained as per the requirements of the Canada Labour Code, Treasury Board Occupational Health and Safety Directive, and any nationally approved training standards; and
    5. annual performance appraisals (as per the Guide to Performance Evaluation) contain a section, which assesses managers and supervisors for their adherence to and the promotion of occupational health and safety in the workplace.
  4. Regional Deputy Commissioners, Institutional Heads, District Directors, Area Directors, Directors of Community Correctional Centres and Sector Heads will ensure:

    1. the development and continuance of full compliance with Treasury Board policies, standards and directives along with pertinent legislation and any CSC standards or guidelines on occupational health and safety;
    2. Workplace Health and Safety Committees or representatives and their initiatives are established and supported for the ongoing functioning of such committees;
    3. staff receive and use appropriate health and safety equipment, clothing, information, instructions, training and supervision (see Annex H - Protective Footwear);
    4. proper emergency procedures are in place in all facilities in order to provide an effective emergency response approach when problems arise;
    5. in consultation with the Workplace Health and Safety Committee, that workplaces, work stations and work processes meet appropriate ergonomic standards. An ergonomic assessment will be performed by a qualified person and recommendations approved by the manager will be implemented in a timely manner; and
    6. Workplace Health and Safety Coordinators are appointed or designated at the institution, district and regional levels.
  5. Managers and supervisors will ensure that all activities are safely performed in a healthy and safe environment including:

    1. instructing employees on all potential hazards, explaining safety precautions and demonstrating proper techniques;
    2. providing first aid to injured or ill employees;
    3. inspecting equipment and records to ensure all are in proper order;
    4. investigating accidents, incidents and near misses and reporting findings to the proper authorities;
    5. observing employee practices and workplace conditions and correcting unsafe practices; and
    6. enforcing departmental rules and procedures.
  6. CSC employees will:

    1. become familiar and comply with the provisions of section 126 in Part II of the Canada Labour Code;
    2. identify and bring to the immediate attention of management, any potential or actual hazardous situations that are likely to cause injury or illness to the employee or another person.

ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

  1. National, Regional and Workplace Health and Safety Committees will be established as prescribed in Part II of the Canada Labour Code and the Treasury Board Occupational Health and Safety Directive. Representation from management and labour will be at the national, regional and workplace levels of CSC as per the Canada Labour Code. In facilities where there are fewer than 20 employees normally employed, a workplace health and safety representative will be designated.

  2. The National Health and Safety Policy Committee will:

    1. be the principal forum for joint labour-management consultation on health and safety policies and issues;
    2. participate in the development of health and safety policies and programs;
    3. address any unresolved substantive issues which arise out of the Regional Health and Safety Policy Committees and which are not currently the subject of grievances; and
    4. report its recommendations to the Executive Committee (see Annex B).
  3. A Regional Health and Safety Policy Committee will be formed in every region to respond to concerns from the Workplace Health and Safety Committees and representatives.

  4. Regional Health and Safety Policy Committees and Workplace Health and Safety Committees will adhere to the terms of reference as developed by CSC (see Annexes B1 and B2).

  5. All references to the health and safety representatives were omitted thereafter to lighten the text. However, should a Workplace Health and Safety Committee not exist, the health and safety representatives are extended the same rights, privileges and protections as those granted to the Committee.

TRAINING

  1. Legislative requirements, Treasury Board policies and CSC's National Training Standards require training for the following groups:

    1. Workplace Health and Safety Committee members:
      1. all newly appointed members will attend the training program as outlined in CSC's National Training Standards; and
      2. refresher training will be provided as required by Workplace Health and Safety Committees.
    2. Managers and supervisors will attend:
      1. the training program as outlined in CSC's National Training Standards; and
      2. refresher training as required by Workplace Health and Safety Committees.
    3. The CSC will develop in consultation with the Health and Safety Committees, an awareness program for all employees that covers, but is not limited to the requirements found in the Canada Labour Code and its pursuant applicable regulations as well as the Treasury Board Occupational Health and Safety Directive.

FIRST AID AND CPR/AED TRAINING

  1. CSC is responsible to:

    1. provide first aid services to employees in accordance with the requirements in Part XVI (First Aid) of the Treasury Board Occupational Health and Safety Directive and as per CSC's National Training Standards;
    2. where there are two or more employees, ensure that an adequate number of qualified first aid attendants are available to render first aid to employees - at least one attendant per 50 employees during each shift or working period at a location;
    3. ensure certification is adhered to in accordance with CSC's National Training Standards;
    4. ensure every workplace has a first aid station with adequate first aid supplies as specified in Part XVI (First Aid) of the Treasury Board Occupational Health and Safety Directive and Part XVI of the Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations;
    5. ensure every workplace where 200 or more employees are working at any time has a first aid room (such a room is not required in a workplace where there is a medical facility);
    6. supply one type "A" first aid kit in the workplace when there are one to five employees;
    7. ensure the kits include supplies for protection against infectious diseases where necessary; and
    8. conspicuously post at each first aid station and first aid room, all appropriate names, work locations (addresses) and telephone numbers that may be required in an emergency. Such numbers will at a minimum include the following:
      1. medical treatment facility,
      2. fire department,
      3. police department, and
      4. poison control centre.

WHAT TO DO WHEN AN ACCIDENT OCCURS

  1. First Aid or Medical Attention - A manager's first responsibility is to ensure that the injured or ill employee has first aid and/or medical attention made available to him or her [see Annex E1 - Response to Incidents Involving an Employee Medical Emergency - Employer Checklist (CSC/SCC 1323-04)].

  2. If the employee requires medical treatment, the employer is responsible for providing suitable transport by ambulance or other means of transportation to either a physician or the hospital, as appropriate.

  3. If the injured or ill person is an employee, the ambulance or other transportation costs will be assumed by the employer.

  4. If the injured or ill person is not an employee but rather a consultant, a volunteer, a temporary agency person, a visitor, a student, etc., the ambulance or other transportation costs will be assumed by the individual.

  5. Demonstrating due diligence, the manager will ask the employee if he or she wishes to be accompanied to the physician or hospital in order to ensure the availability of medical care.

  6. If appropriate or requested, the manager must contact the Critical Incident Stress Management Team to provide support to the employee and those affected by the incident.

  7. Modified work can be made available to assist in facilitating early return to work if physical or psychological precautions can be immediately determined with appropriate medical recommendation(s) in light of CSC's duty to accommodate (see Annex E).

  8. An immediate investigation will be conducted at the scene of the accident in the prescribed manner pursuant to the provisions of the Canada Labour Code.

  9. In the event of a critical injury or a fatality:

    1. the local police, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) - Labour Program - and a worker representing the Workplace Health and Safety Committee have legal authority under Part II of the Canada Labour Code to investigate the circumstances surrounding the accident;
    2. the CSC representative will ensure that the scene of the accident is left undisturbed (e.g. rope off the area) until all such investigations are complete, except in order to preserve life or minimize the possibility of further risk; and
    3. a copy of the investigation report must be forwarded to the Commissioner or his/her delegate.
  10. Immediately upon learning of the work-related illness or injury, the manager is responsible to ensure that:

    1. the Workers’ Compensation Board report of the accident is completed and sent to the local WCB office (see Annex F for provincial WCB forms); and
    2. the HRSDC Hazardous Occurrence Investigation Report (LAB 1070) is properly completed and forwarded as required to the local HRSDC Labour Program office, the Regional Occupational Health and Safety Coordinator and the Workplace Health and Safety Committee (see Annex D).

HAZARDOUS OCCURRENCE INVESTIGATION

  1. CSC will meet the requirements established in Part II of the Canada Labour Code and the Treasury Board Occupational Health and Safety Directive with regard to:

    1. the investigation, recording, and reporting of all accidents, occupational diseases and other hazardous occurrences that it is aware of; and
    2. the development, in consultation with the Workplace Health and Safety Committee, of hazardous occurrence investigation procedures and methodology, including the process for selecting and appointing a qualified person to conduct investigations.
  2. Investigations of hazardous occurrences by a qualified person will begin as soon as possible after the occurrence has been reported.

  3. Workplace Health and Safety Committee members must be informed within 24 hours of any hazardous occurrence.

  4. When an employee dies or suffers a serious bodily injury in the workplace, CSC will investigate the matter in accordance with Part XV of the Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations and a copy of the investigation report must be forwarded to the Commissioner or his/her delegate (see Annexes D and E).

FIRE SAFETY

  1. CSC has adopted uniform procedures and recommended practices that will enable all units to maintain a high standard in fire safety performance and so minimize the risk of life and property loss from fire. (See CD 345 - Fire Safety and the Fire Safety Manual.)

EMERGENCY PLANS

  1. Emergency plans will:

    1. include information on how to effectively respond to workplace health and safety emergencies; and
    2. be located within the operational unit's contingency plan.
  2. All employees will be provided with information on the content of these plans by the Institutional Head.

  3. Workplace Health and Safety Committees will be involved in the design of the plans as they relate to health and safety issues.

  4. Those employees directly involved with health and safety emergency planning must be mentioned in the operational unit's overall contingency plan.

  5. The emergency plans shall make clear reference to the process involved in dealing with health and safety emergencies and the action to be taken by the appropriate staff. (Refer to CD 600 - Management of Emergencies.)

TELEWORK

  1. The telework arrangement will be in accordance with the guidelines set out in the Treasury Board Policy on Telework (see Annex C).

  2. Under the revised Canada Labour Code, a new provision eliminates the employer's right to demand to inspect telework locations in private homes without the employee's permission.

MATERNITY-RELATED REASSIGNMENT AND LEAVE

  1. Treasury Board policy on maternity-related reassignment or leave allows pregnant or nursing employees to request a temporary job modification or work reassignment without loss of pay.

  2. Part II of the Canada Labour Code provides that a pregnant or nursing employee may withdraw from work activities that she believes to be posing a risk to her health or that of the foetus or child until she obtains a medical certificate stating whether such a risk exists.

  3. While the employee is attempting to get the medical certificate, the employer may, in consultation with the employee, assign her to another job that would not pose a risk to her health or to that of the foetus or child.

  4. Without prejudice to any other right conferred by the Canada Labour Code, by a collective agreement or other agreement or by any terms and conditions of employment, once the medical practitioner has established whether there is a risk as described in paragraph 45, the employee may no longer cease to perform her job under paragraph 45.

  5. The employee, whether or not she has been reassigned to another job, is deemed to continue to hold the job that she held at the time she ceased to perform her job functions and will continue to receive the wages and benefits that are attached to that job for the period during which she does not perform the job.

PROTECTION AGAINST ULTRAVIOLET RAYS (UV)

  1. Senior management, in consultation with Workplace Health and Safety Committees, will review all situations where employees are required to work outdoors and take all reasonable practicable measures to reduce exposure to the harmful effects of the sun.

HAZARD PREVENTION

  1. CSC, in consultation with Health and Safety Policy Committees, will develop, implement and monitor a program for the prevention of hazards, including ergonomics-related hazards in the workplace.

INTERNAL COMPLAINT RESOLUTION PROCESS

  1. Employees and management must make every effort to settle complaints themselves before a government Health and Safety Officer will get involved, in accordance with section 127.1 of Part II of the Canada Labour Code.

  2. The purpose of this process is to:

    1. allow a graduated series of investigations to resolve workplace issues while maintaining employment safety;
    2. provide the resolution of workplace health and safety issues in a more timely and efficient manner; and
    3. reinforce the concept of the internal responsibility system.

REFUSAL TO WORK IF DANGER IS PRESENT

  1. The process to follow with regard to a refusal to work is outlined in sections 128 and 129 of Part II of the Canada Labour Code.

  2. Section 128 of the Canada Labour Code provides that an employee may refuse to use or operate a machine or thing, to work in a place or to perform an activity, if he or she while at work, has reasonable cause to believe that the use or operation of the machine or thing, or a condition existing in the workplace or the performance of the activity constitutes a danger to him or her or to another employee.

  3. In the event that an Assurance of Voluntary Compliance or direction is initiated by a HRSDC Health and Safety Officer under Part II of the Canada Labour Code, or that one is imminent, it will be reported by telephone, facsimile or electronic mail by the Regional Chief of Staff Relations to the Director General of Labour Relations at National Headquarters.

  4. If the work refusal affects the physical security of the facility, it will be treated as a security incident and be reported by telephone to National Headquarters, in accordance with CD 568-1 - Recording and Reporting of Security Incidents.

WORKPLACE HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION SYSTEM (WHMIS)

  1. The purpose of the WHMIS is to ensure that the hazards of materials produced, imported or used in Canadian workplaces are identified by suppliers using standard criteria as set out in the Hazardous Products Act and Part X of the Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations. The supplier must ensure that the information regarding hazardous materials is transmitted to affected employers and employees.

  2. The WHMIS is mandatory at all work sites using hazardous materials. This system includes the following three components:

    1. labels;
    2. Material Safety Data Sheets (from the supplier); and
    3. an employee education program.
  3. Every facility will, in consultation with the Workplace Health and Safety Committee, develop and implement an employee education program with respect to hazard prevention and control at the workplace (sections 124 and 125 of the Canada Labour Code).

RESPIRATORY PROTECTION

  1. CSC should provide the minimum response necessary to ensure the safe and effective resolution of any emergency and to secure the safety of any person on its premises while minimizing the risk to staff who are involved.

  2. Any respiratory protection equipment should be considered as a last resort when administrative and building controls fail to ensure a safe atmosphere for occupants. (See Annex G - Respiratory Protection in CSC.)

CONFINED SPACE SAFETY

  1. Management and employees are jointly responsible for the safety of all personnel entering a confined space.

  2. All necessary precautions must be taken to protect the employee from a dangerous atmosphere, to prevent the employee from becoming entrapped in stored material, and to ensure the employee's safety.

  3. A confined space entry program is mandatory at all work sites involving locations classified as confined spaces as defined in Part XI of the Treasury Board Occupational Health and Safety Directive and Part XI of the Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations.

FALL PROTECTION SYSTEM

  1. CSC will provide a fall protection system according to Part III - Elevated Structures of the Treasury Board Occupational Health and Safety Directiveand Part XII of the Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations.

PROTECTIVE FOOTWEAR

  1. The Executive Committee of the National Joint Council (NJC) approved the new Treasury Board Occupational Health and Safety Directive, effective April 1, 2008.

  2. Part XII of this new directive states that employers will make provisions to provide protective footwear free of charge.

  3. This directive does not affect the Correctional Officer footwear allowance (see Annex H - Protective Footwear).

REPORTING MECHANISMS

  1. The following reports will be completed as per HRSDC requirements:

    1. Hazardous Occurrence Investigation Report (HOIR) (LAB 1070) - For ALL accidents, occupational diseases and other hazardous occurrences (including near miss).
      1. The immediate supervisor will without delay appoint a qualified person to carry out the investigation using the HOIR. The Workplace Health and Safety Committee will be informed of any hazardous occurrence and the name of the qualified person appointed to investigate no more than 24 hours after the occurrence has been reported. A copy of the HOIR will be submitted to the Workplace Committee for review and comments.
      2. The report must be sent to HRSDC in certain specific cases as described in Part XV - Hazardous Occurrence Investigation Recording and Reporting of the Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations. (See Annex D - Hazardous Occurrence Investigation Report.)
    2. Employer’s Annual Hazardous Occurrence Investigation Report (LAB 1009) -  A summary of all accidents and other hazardous occurrences involving employees, including minor and disabling injuries. Regional Occupational Health and Safety Coordinators, will obtain data from their local facilities and submit a completed report to the National Occupational Health and Safety Advisor, at National Headquarters, by March 1st every year.
    3. Health and Safety Committee Report (LAB 1058) - Workplace Health and Safety Committees will submit each year a copy of this report to the Regional Occupational Health and Safety Coordinators for submission to the HRSDC local office as well as to the National Occupational Health and Safety Advisor, at National Headquarters.

CONFIDENTIALITY OF INFORMATION

  1. 70. Confidentiality, in the context of the law, refers to the obligation to refrain from willingly disclosing information that has been received in confidence.

  2. 71. It does not refer to situations in which the law requires or allows a person to divulge information.

AUDIT AND EVALUATION

  1. In accordance with the Treasury Board Policy on Internal Audit, Regional Deputy Commissioners will ensure that all work sites are audited for compliance to established health and safety policies and procedures on an annual basis, utilizing any audit system established by the Human Resource Management Sector. The results of such audits will be shared with the Executive Committee.

  2. The Performance Assurance staff will incorporate the evaluation of the Occupational Health and Safety Program as part of its long-range audit plan.


Assistant Commissioner,
Human Resource Management

Original signed by:
Cheryl Fraser


Annex A

APPROVED TREASURY BOARD POLICIES, DIRECTIVES, STANDARDS, PROCEDURES, GUIDES, ADVISORY NOTICES AND REGULATIONS ON OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY

POLICIES

DIRECTIVES AND STANDARDS

FIRE PROTECTION STANDARDS

PROCEDURES

GUIDES

ADVISORY NOTICES

REGULATIONS RESPECTING OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY

The Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations state the minimum requirements, which every federal workplace in Canada is required to follow. The above Treasury Board documents are based on these regulations as well as those of the National Joint Council of Treasury Board and Public Service unions.

The Regulations deal with the following:

  • Part I: Interpretation - Includes definitions and records.
  • Part II: Permanent Structures - Includes doors; clearances; floor and wall openings; open-top bins, hoppers, vats and pits; ladders, stairways and ramps; docks, ramps and dock plates; guardrails; toe boards; housekeeping and maintenance; and temporary heating.
  • Part III: Temporary Structures and Excavations - Includes barricades; guardrails and toe boards; temporary stairs, ramps and platforms; scaffolds; portable ladders; excavation; safety nets; and housekeeping.
  • Part IV: Elevating Devices - Includes use and operation; inspection and testing; and repair and maintenance.
  • Part V: Boilers and Pressure Vessels - Includes design, construction, testing, inspection and installation; low-water cut-off devices; use, operation, repair, alteration and maintenance; inspections; buried pressure vessels; and records.
  • Part VI: Lighting - Includes measurement of average levels of lighting; emergency lighting; and minimum levels of lighting.
  • Part VII: Levels of Sound - Includes measurement and calculation of exposure; hazard investigation, limits or exposure; reduction of sound exposure; report to regional Health and Safety Officer; hearing protection; and warning signs.
  • Part VIII: Electrical Safety - Includes safety procedures; safety watcher; coordination of work; poles and elevated structures; isolation of electrical equipment; guarantees of isolation for electrical equipment; live test; termination of guarantee of isolation; safety grounding; and switches and control devices.
  • Part IX: Sanitation - Includes general requirements; toilet rooms; wash basins; showers and shower rooms; potable water; field accommodation; preparation, handling, storage and serving of food; food waste and garbage; lunch rooms; ventilation; and clothing storage.
  • Part X: Hazardous Substances (Division I: General; Division II: Hazardous Substances Other than Controlled Products; Division III: Controlled Products) - Includes records of hazardous substances; hazard investigation; medical examinations; storage, handling and use; warning of hazardous substances; employee education; substitution of substances; ventilation; control of hazards; warnings; assembly of pipes; explosives; ionizing and non-ionizing radiation; Material Safety Data Sheets; labels; portable containers; special cases; laboratories; signs; replacing labels; exemptions from disclosure; hazardous waste; and information required in medical emergency.
  • Part XI: Confined Spaces - Includes hazard assessment; confined space entry procedures; emergency procedures and equipment; hot work; ventilation equipment; training; and record keeping.
  • Part XII: Safety Materials, Equipment, Devices and Clothing - Includes protective headwear; protective footwear; eye and face protection; respiratory protection; skin protection; fall-protection systems; protection against drowning; loose clothing; protection against moving vehicles; records; instructions and training; and defective protection equipment.
  • Part XIII: Tools and Machinery - Includes design, construction, operation and use of tools; defective tools and machines; instructions and training; general requirements for machine guards; use, operation, repair and maintenance of machine guards; abrasive wheels; mechanical power transmission apparatus; woodworking machinery; and punch presses.
  • Part XIV: Materials Handling (Division I: Design and Construction) - Includes protection from falling objects; protection from overturning; seat-belts; fuel tanks; protection from elements; vibration; controls; fire extinguishers; means of entering and exiting; lighting; control systems; warning devices; rear view mirrors; guided industrial vehicles; and conveyors.
  • Part XIV: Materials Handling (Division II: Maintenance, Use and Operation) - Includes inspection, testing and maintenance; mobile cranes; split rim wheels; instruction and training; qualifications; signals; gradients; repairs; transporting and positioning employees; loading, unloading and maintenance while in motion; positioning the load; tools; housekeeping; parking; materials handling area; hazard areas; rear dumping; fuelling; ropes, slings and chains; safe working loads; aisles and corridors; and clearances.
  • Part XIV: Materials Handling (Division III: Manual Handling of Materials) - Includes requirements for instructions, training, and records of instructions for the handling of goods or things which may be hazardous because of the weight, size, shape, toxicity or other characteristics.
  • Part XIV: Materials Handling (Division IV: Storage of Materials) - Includes very general requirements for the storage of materials: floor capacity; and no obstruction of light, access to fire-fighting equipment or passageways.
  • Part XIV: Materials Handling (Division V: Transitional Provisions) - Covers material handling equipment in use at the time an amendment comes into force.
  • Part XV: Hazardous Occurrence Investigation, Recording and Reporting - Includes reports by employee; investigations; telephone or telex reports; records; minor injury records; written reports; annual report; and retention of reports and records.
  • Part XVI: First Aid - Includes first aid attendants; first aid stations; communication of information; first aid supplies and equipment; first aid rooms; transportation; and records.
  • Part XVII: Safe Occupancy of the Workplace - Includes fire protection equipment; emergency evacuation plan; emergency procedures; instructions and training; emergency wardens; inspections; meetings of emergency wardens and drills; and fire hazard areas.
  • Part XIX: Hazard Prevention Program - Covers implementation plan; hazard identification (including ergonomics-related hazards) and assessment methodology; preventive measures; employee education; program evaluation; and reports and records.

Safety and Health Committees and Representatives Regulations - Covers the selection of members; chairpersons; vacancy of office; quorum; minutes; annual report; selection of representatives; and term of office.


Annex B

National Health and Safety Policy Committee

TERMS OF REFERENCE

Details of the establishment and function of this type of committee are contained in section 134.1 of Part II of the Canada Labour Code.

1. Name of Committee

National Health and Safety Policy Committee (NHSPC)

2. Constituency

The Committee will serve the employees of the CSC across the country.

3. Authorities

Part II of the Canada Labour Code

Part XVIII of the Treasury Board Occupational Health and Safety Directive (which outlines the application, requirement and operating principles for National and Regional Health and Safety Policy Committees)

Public Service Collective Agreements

4. Function of the Committee

The NHSPC will:

  1. be the principal forum for joint labour-management consultation on occupational health and safety (OHS) policies and issues;
  2. look at longer term, broader, strategic and emerging OHS issues; and
  3. through its reviews, provide corporate leadership and strategic direction to OHS national steering committees and Regional and Workplace Health and Safety Committees or representatives.
5. Composition and Training

The Committee will be composed of the following members:

Employer Representatives

Assistant Commissioner, Human Resource Management

Assistant Commissioner, Health Services

Assistant Deputy Commissioner, Institutional Operations

Director General, Technical Services

Employee Representatives

Employee representatives will be selected by the trade union representing employees, in consultation with any employees who are not so represented.

  • Union of Solicitor General Employees (USGE)
  • Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada (PIPSC)
  • Union of Canadian Correctional Officers (UCCO-SACC-CSN)
  • Association of Canadian Financial Officers (ACFO)
Chairpersons

Employer - Assistant Commissioner, Human Resource Management

Employees - As selected by the employee representatives of NHSPC

Executive Secretariat

Director General, Labour Relations and Compensation Branch

Director, Workforce Wellbeing

Advisors

Manager, Fire Safety Program

Legal Counsel

Committee members may select alternates to serve as replacements for members who are unable to perform their functions or attend meetings.

Members will be trained in accordance with standards set out in Part II of the Canada Labour Code.

6. Mandate of the Committee

The principal function of the NHSPC is to provide a forum:

  1. to ensure that a national level commitment is made by employer and employee representatives to the provision of a healthy and safe working environment for all CSC staff (this commitment will be in keeping with the Corrections and Conditional Release Act and the CSC Mission);
  2. to identify OHS policies and issues which have broad, long term implications for CSC and recommend strategies to address them (this includes training standards for Workplace Health and Safety Committee members);
  3. to set the strategic direction and foster consultation and coordination among Regional and Workplace Health and Safety Committees and related steering committees;
  4. to review and resolve substantive OHS issues that have a national impact as well as those issues, not currently the subject of grievance(s), that cannot be resolved satisfactorily by Regional and Workplace Health and Safety Committees;
  5. to participate in the development and monitoring of a program for the prevention of hazards in the workplace and for the education of employees in OHS matters;
  6. to participate in the development of a monitoring program for the provision of personal protective equipment, clothing, devices or materials to ensure safety within the workplace;
  7. to ensure that changes made to work processes and procedures take into account the health and safety of employees;
  8. to monitor overall progress and provide guidance to those working on solutions and actions required to address OHS issues;
  9. to establish the link between the various sectors, regions and levels of the CSC and the Executive Committee for OHS issues; and
  10. to offer advice and make recommendations to the Executive Committee on broader OHS policies and issues and their implications for CSC operations and staff.
7. Role

The NHSPC has the following role:

  1. to provide direction on the development, revision and interpretation of national OHS policies and standards;
  2. to review, discuss and resolve OHS issues of national impact on CSC or issues which have significant impact on one or more regions;
  3. to invite technical experts or advisors as required from time to time to take part in national inquiries and investigations pertaining to OHS matters, including cooperating with Health and Safety Officers when investigations are being conducted;
  4. to have full access to all correspondence and reports relating to health and safety issues being discussed, but not have access to the medical records of any employee, except with the consent of the employee;
  5. to propose and recommend pilot projects and research as required;
  6. to request any information from the employer that the Committee considers necessary to identify existing or potential hazards with respect to materials, processes, equipment or activities in any of the employer's workplaces;
  7. to review national statistical reports on inquiries, accidents, injuries and other hazardous occurrences in order to determine the need for further investigation or research on potential problem areas;
  8. to review and recommend appropriate training programs in health and safety for implementation across the Service; and
  9. to approve the terms of reference of all the Regional Health and Safety Policy Committees.
8. Meetings
  1. The Committee will meet during normal working hours at least quarterly. Special meetings, if required, will be held at the request of the chairpersons.
  2. The meeting dates for the following year will be decided upon one year in advance, to be scheduled by September of each year.
  3. Agreement must be reached between employer and employee representatives on the need to bring issues to the national level for discussion.
  4. A quorum will consist of a majority of members providing that at least half are employee representatives and one is an employer representative.
  5. Committee members will attempt to arrive at a consensus rather than voting on any issue.
  6. Should regional union representatives be required to attend any meetings, they will not suffer the loss of basic wages and will be entitled to reimbursement in accordance with the provisions of their collective agreements.
9. Records
  1. The Committee will keep records of all matters that come before it, and respect the confidentiality of the documents distributed at meetings.
  2. Committee meeting attendees will not share, with others, information disseminated at meetings that is of a personal nature without the prior written consent of the person to whom the records belong.
10. Agenda and Minutes
  1. An agenda will be prepared by the Executive Secretariat, distributed to members prior to the meeting and adopted at the meeting.
  2. Minutes will be prepared in French and English as soon as possible after the meeting and will be sent to all participants and Executive Committee members, placed on the InfoNet and shared with all Workplace Health and Safety Committee members, once approved by both chairpersons.
  3. Copies of minutes and reports of Committee activities will be forwarded to HRSDC (Labour Program) as required.
11. Executive Officers
  1. The Committee will have two chairpersons, one for the employer, and the other for the employees. The chair will alternate between these two.
  2. The Executive Secretariat will be responsible for keeping records of the meetings as well as for preparing and distributing agendas, minutes and any final reports under the direction of the chairperson representing the employer.
12. Amendments

These terms of reference may be amended by consensus or a majority vote of the Committee members.

ACFO    ___________________________________

PIPSC    ___________________________________

UCCO-SACC-CSN    _________________________

USGE    ___________________________________

Chairperson representing employer

___________________________________

Date: ________________________

Employee representatives of the National Health and Safety Policy Committee

___________________________________

Date: ________________________


Annex B1

Regional Health and Safety Policy Committee

TERMS OF REFERENCE

1. Name of Committee

Regional Health and Safety Policy Committee (RHSPC)

2. Constituency

The Committee will serve the employees of the CSC within each region.

3. Authorities

Part XVIII of the Treasury Board Occupational Health and Safety Directive (which outlines the application, requirement and operating principles for National and Regional Health and Safety Policy Committees)

Public Service Collective Agreements

4. Function of the Committee

The RHSPC will be the principle forum for joint labour-management consultation on occupational health and safety (OHS) issues, and for the development of regional solutions to these issues.

5. Membership Composition
  1. The RHSPC will have equal representation from the employer and employees.
  2. The membership will be decided by the Committee with at least one member from each union.

    Chairpersons

  3. The Committee will have two chairpersons, one for the employer and one for the employees.
  4. The employer's chairperson will be appointed by the Regional Deputy Commissioner.
  5. The employees' chairperson will be chosen by the employee representatives.
  6. The chair will alternate between the two at a frequency mutually agreed to.

    Recording Secretary

  7. The employer's chairperson will make provisions for a secretary.
  8. When the employer's chairperson changes, provisions for a new secretary will be made at the same time.
  9. The Committee could be further composed of the following members:

    Management Representatives

    • Regional Deputy Commissioner or Assistant Deputy Commissioner
    • Regional Administrator, Human Resources
    • Representative from Correctional Operations and Programs
    • Regional Administrator, Technical Services
    • Regional Occupational Health and Safety Coordinator
    • Regional Chief, Operational Fire Safety
    • Institutional Heads
    • District Directors

    Employee Representatives

    • Union of Solicitor General Employees (USGE)
    • Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada (PIPSC)
    • Union of Canadian Correctional Officers (UCCO-SACC-CSN)
    • Association of Canadian Financial Officers (ACFO)
    • Canadian Association of Professional Employees (CAPE)
    • International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW)
    • Resource Persons
    • Regional Occupational Health and Safety Coordinator
    • Other resource people will be called upon as required.
6. Mandate of the Committee

The principle function of the RHSPC is to provide a forum:

  1. to ensure the consistent application of health and safety policies throughout the region in order to provide a healthy and safe working environment for all employees in keeping with Core Value 3 of the Mission, which indicates that "our strength and our major resource […] is our staff";
  2. to review and resolve substantive health and safety issues that have been examined by the Workplace Health and Safety Committees and that could not be resolved satisfactorily;
  3. to monitor the OHS Program within the region to ensure compliance with Part II of the Canada Labour Code, relevant policies and regulations as well as the Treasury Board Occupational Health and Safety Directive;
  4. to bring to the attention of the NHSPC any significant OHS issues that cannot be resolved satisfactorily at the regional level; and
  5. to ensure that all health and safety concerns are brought and remain into the open until they have been resolved.
7. Role

The RHSPC has the following role:

  1. to provide assistance and advice to Workplace Health and Safety Committees on the development, revision and interpretation of national and regional OHS policies, procedures and standards;
  2. to review, discuss and resolve OHS issues having regional or local impact on the CSC and to ensure that decisions are communicated to field operations;
  3. to review any unresolved OHS concerns that have arisen in the meetings of Workplace Health and Safety Committees;
  4. to have full access to all correspondence and reports relating to OHS issues being discussed, such as investigation reports completed by Health Canada and HRSDC (Labour Program), but not have access to the medical records of any employee, except with the consent of the employee;
  5. to propose and authorize pilot projects and research on OHS issues as required;
  6. to review regional and local statistical reports on accidents, injuries and other hazardous occurrences in order to determine the need for further investigation or research on potential problem areas;
  7. to review and recommend appropriate training programs in health and safety for implementation within the region, in consultation with the NHSPC and the Staff College; and
  8. to ensure that the NHSPC approves the RHSPC's terms of reference.
8. Meetings
  1. The RHSPC will meet at least once every quarter during normal working hours.
  2. Regions should consider monthly meetings if feasible and necessary.
  3. Special meetings, if required, will be held at the request of either one of the chairpersons.
  4. Conference calls can be used as an option.
  5. Issues may be brought to the RHSPC by any member of the Committee provided they meet the basic criteria described below.
  6. Agreement should normally be reached between the chairpersons on the need to bring any local or regional issues to the NHSPC for discussion and resolution; however, only one chairperson needs to raise the item to the national level.
  7. Committee members will attempt to arrive at a consensus rather than voting on any issue.
  8. There should normally be no alternates for the chairpersons except in emergency situations. Other Committee members may send substitute representatives if they are unavailable to attend meetings.
  9. A quorum will consist of a majority of members providing that at least half are employee representatives and one is an employer representative.
  10. Any time spent by union representatives carrying out endorsed Committee functions will, for the purpose of calculating wages, be deemed to have been spent at work. This means that members or alternates will not suffer the loss of basic wages for attending regional meetings. Any reimbursement for those employees attending meetings will be in accordance with the provisions of their collective agreements.
  11. Basic Criteria - To be examined by the RHSPC, unresolved health and safety issues must first be discussed by the Workplace Health and Safety Committee and recorded in the minutes. In addition, the Committee member presenting the unresolved issue will forward to the RHSPC a copy of the Workplace Committee minutes where it was raised.
9. Records

The Committee will keep records of all matters that come before it.

10. Agenda and Minutes
  1. An agenda will be prepared by the secretary, distributed to members at least seven days prior to the meeting and adopted at the meeting.
  2. Minutes will be prepared as soon as possible after the meeting and will be sent expeditiously to all participants and the National Occupational Health and Safety Coordinator, at National Headquarters. Minutes will also be sent to the National Presidents of the employee groups.
  3. Copies of minutes and activity reports will be forwarded to HRSDC (Labour Program) as required.
11. Amendments

The terms of reference established for the RHSPC may only be amended by consensus.

12. Communication
  1. The RHSPC will keep an accurate listing of Workplace Health and Safety Committee representatives, including the names of chairpersons, within their regions.
  2. To provide a method of accessing information between these committees, the listing should be posted on the regional InfoNet site, as well as in every facility within the region.


Annex B2

Workplace Health and Safety Committee

TERMS OF REFERENCE

1. Name of Committee

Committees will be known as Workplace Health and Safety Committee (WHSC) for each specified facility (e.g. Kingston Penitentiary HSC).

2. Mandatory Establishment
  1. In accordance with section 135 of the Canada Labour Code, a WHSC is mandatory for all workplaces where there are 20 or more employees.
  2. CSC recognizes health and safety as important aspects in achieving its Mission and in supporting Core Value 3, which indicates that "our strength and our major resource […] is our staff".
3. Objective

To provide a formalized structure for the consistent and efficient functioning of WHSCs within the CSC.

4. Authorities

Section 135 in Part II of the Canada Labour Code

Parts I and II of the Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations

Treasury Board Occupational Health and Safety Directive, Part XVIII - Health and Safety Committees and Representatives

5. Function of the Committee
  1. The WHSC will be recognized as an equal part of the operation of the facility and the Institutional Head or District Director will ensure that the Committee has the cooperation of all employees to fulfil its mandate.
  2. The Institutional Head or District Director will ensure that the WHSC has an opportunity to participate in the development or review of all new procedures and programs.
6. Selection of Members

Committee members will be selected in accordance with section 135.1 of the Canada Labour Code.

  1. The Committee will have two chairpersons, one of whom will be an employee representative and the other will be a management appointee.
  2. The Committee will consist of at least two persons, half of whom will be employee representatives.
  3. Terms for Committee members are normally two years.
  4. A person may be selected as a member for more than one term.
  5. In the event that a member resigns or ceases to be a member for any other reason, the vacancy will be filled within 30 days after the next meeting. A replacement process must be in place to meet the needs of each site.
  6. If a member does not attend three consecutive meetings, without reasonable excuse, he or she can be removed from the Committee at the discretion of the chairpersons.
  7. Alternates should be designated to ensure appropriate attendance.
  8. The names, work locations and contact numbers of all Committee members will be posted in a conspicuous and convenient place.
  9. A contact process for Committee members away from the work site should be developed for emergency purposes (i.e. keeping a list of home telephone numbers of members and contact protocol in the Correctional Manager's office).
  10. Members will represent all employees on OHS matters and not solely those who fall under their current grouping or position.
  11. Resource people may attend as technical advisors to the Committee and are not considered formal members. These may include but are not limited to Health Canada, fire safety, and security advisors.
7. Management Representatives
  1. It is important that the employer members on the Committee have the authority to take corrective action. This representation will ensure that matters can be acted upon, discussed and approved at the meeting.
  2. Normally, the Assistant Warden of Management Services, Correctional Manager and Fire Chief or equivalent positions in non-institutional settings are some of the members on the Committee.
  3. The management representatives on the Committee will have management authority and they are encouraged to play an active role in Committee activities such as participating in sub-committees responsible for procedure monitoring, workplace inspections, safety promotions, meeting agendas, etc.
  4. Time spent on Committee activities by management representatives will be recognized as part of their job functions and given appropriate priority.
8. Employee Representatives

The Committee members selected by the union will not be managerial exclusions.

9. Chairpersons
  1. The WHSC will have two alternating chairpersons, one selected by the employee representatives and the other by the Institutional Head, District Director or designate.
  2. Normally, management appoints the Assistant Warden of Management Services or those in equivalent positions in non-institutional settings to the management chairperson positions.
  3. The chairperson may be the Assistant Warden of Management Services or the responsibility centre head may choose another individual or the management representatives on the Committee may select a chairperson from amongst the management members.
10. Recording Secretary

A recording secretary will be appointed by the chairpersons. The recording secretary will be responsible for ensuring that agenda and minutes are prepared and distributed.

11. Procedures

The Committee will act in accordance with the following procedures:

  1. The Committee will establish its own rules of procedure, including the Institutional Head or District Director also as co-signer of minutes; the time, place and frequency of regular meetings; and any other rules of procedures for its operations that it considers advisable.
  2. The Committee will meet at least nine times a year (preferably at least once a month) during regular working hours and, on urgent matters, as required.
  3. The chairpersons will act alternately and equally share the role of chairing meetings.
  4. A quorum will consist of a majority of the members, of whom at least half are employee representatives and at least one is a management representative.
12. Powers

The WHSC has the following powers and obligations in accordance with section 135 of the Canada Labour Code:

  1. The Committee will receive, consider and expeditiously dispose of complaints relating to the health and safety of employees under its representation.
  2. It will cooperate with all health and safety officials in the workplace and with the Health and Safety Officer of HRSDC (Labour Program).
  3. It will establish, promote and monitor health and safety programs, including employee education and training.
  4. It will take part in surveys and investigations, including consultations with persons who are professionally or technically qualified to advise the Committee on such matters. (The Committee's involvement may, by agreement between the chairpersons, be limited to selected management and employee representatives.)
  5. It will notify the supervisor or management of the workplace where it finds a deficiency in any part of the OHS Program.
  6. It may request from the employer such information as either party of the Committee deems necessary to identify potential and existing health and safety hazards with respect to materials, processes or equipment in the workplace.
  7. It will also have full access to all correspondence and reports relating to health and safety, but will not have access to personal medical records without the consent of the employee involved.
  8. It will assist in determining the requirements of personal protective equipment pursuant to Part XII - Personal and Protective Equipment and Clothing of the Treasury Board Occupational Health and Safety Directive.
  9. It will participate in all inquiries and investigations pertaining to OHS conducted by the employer.
  10. It may advise management on how to improve health and safety in the workplace.
  11. It will maintain and evaluate data on accidents, incidents and hazards. It will ensure that adequate records are kept on work accidents, injuries, illnesses and health hazards, monitoring these records and sending annual reports to National Headquarters.
  12. It will, in consultation with the employer, review the WHMIS employee education program at least once each year or more often if conditions change or if new products are introduced into the workplace.
  13. It will bring to the attention of the RHSPC any significant health and safety issues that cannot be resolved satisfactorily at the local level.
13. Records
  1. The Committee will maintain accurate records of the following:
    1. the disposition of all health and safety complaints it receives, considers and disposes of;
    2. adequate information on accidents, incidents, injuries and health hazards;
    3. programs, measures and procedures that were monitored; and
    4. the results of the appropriate monitoring.
  2. The Committee will ensure that accurate information is input into the Health/Safety Module of the Human Resource Management System by making sure that an individual is designated at each facility to enter data.
  3. The Committee will utilize reports generated from this module to identify trends, areas of occurrences and location of incidents. These reports will assist in prioritizing areas of concern within each facility.
14. Agenda and Minutes
  1. An agenda will be prepared by the secretary under the direction of the chairpersons and distributed to members one week prior to the meeting. Additional items may be added to the agenda at the beginning of the meeting and adopted by the members.
  2. The Committee will keep minutes of each of its meetings. As soon as possible after every meeting, the minutes will be approved by both chairpersons. Institutional Heads or District Directors are to be included as co-signers of the minutes.
  3. The minutes will be distributed as follows:
    1. senior head of the facility and each member of the WHSC;
    2. Regional Occupational Health and Safety Coordinator;
    3. National Occupational Health and Safety Coordinator, at National Headquarters; and
    4. regional and national executive of the unions.
  4. As soon as the minutes are approved, the chairpersons will ensure that a copy is posted at the workplace and remains posted for a period of three months.
  5. The facility will keep a copy of the minutes at the workplace to which it applies for two years from the day on which the meeting was held.
  6. This copy will be readily available for inspection by the Health and Safety Officer of HRSDC (Labour Program).
  7. Standing items on Committee agendas will include:
    1. Review of Previous Minutes
    2. Staff Accident Reports
    3. Action Items
    4. Workplace Health and Safety Inspections
    5. Staff Concerns
    6. Training
    7. Fire Drills/Fire Safety
    8. Health and Safety Complaints and How They Are Resolved
    9. Correspondence/Memos Received
    10. New Business
    11. Roundtable Discussion
    12. Inmate Injuries of an Accidental Nature (if applicable).
  8. All inmate injuries of an accidental nature will be tracked and reviewed by the WHSC in each CSC facility.
  9. The WHSC will review and discuss the inmate injuries, to recommend corrective measures to prevent the recurrence of a similar incident. See Report of Inmate Injury (CSC/SCC 0046) and, if applicable, Officer's Statement/Observation Report CSC/SCC 0875).
15. Refusal to Work
  1. Pursuant to subsection 128 (1) of the Canada Labour Code, an employee may refuse to work when there is reasonable cause to believe that:
    1. the use or operation of a machine or thing constitutes a danger to the employee or to another employee; or
    2. a condition exists in the workplace that constitutes a danger to the employee; or
    3. the performance of the activity by the employee constitutes a danger to the employee or to another employee.
  2. Exceptions
  3. The employee may not refuse to work when:
    1. the refusal puts the life, health or safety of another person directly in danger; or
    2. the danger referred to is a normal condition of employment.
  4. Responsibilities of WHSC
  5. The employer will inform the WHSC of the refusal to work and the action taken to resolve it, pursuant to subsection 128(8) of the Canada Labour Code
  6. At least one member of the WHSC representing the employee will investigate without delay, with the employee who reported the danger (he or she may chose not to be present) and the employer to decide if a danger does exist.
16. Workplace Inspections
  1. Regular workplace inspections are required in ensuring that the standards prescribed in the Canada Labour Code and Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations are met. (See attached examples of workplace inspection forms, which may be adapted for each facility.)
  2. The WHSC will conduct each month an inspection of all or part of the work site, so that every part of the workplace is inspected at least once each year.
  3. Health and Safety Officers of HRSDC (Labour Program) are authorized to conduct workplace inspections under the accompaniment of:
    1. an employee member and an employer member of the WHSC; or
    2. the health and safety representative and a person designated by the employer.
17. Key Components of Workplace Inspections
  1. Planning
    1. The WHSC will ensure that all workplaces within the facility are inspected.
    2. Regular planned inspections are to be conducted by a team including a member of the WHSC, the manager or supervisor of the area and an employee familiar with the work process.
  2. Inspecting
    1. The WHSC should ensure that a checklist of potential hazards is developed. (HRSDC prepared a guide entitled "Workplace Inspections: A Matter of Health and Safety" for use during inspections.)
    2. Inspections should not unnecessarily disrupt work activities nor attach blame for hazards observed.
    3. Attention must be drawn to the presence of any immediate danger and action taken by the supervisor or manager. Other items can await the final report.
  3. Reporting
    1. The report must be fully completed and accurate. It shall identify the location of inspection, hazards observed, recommended action, responsible person and action taken.
    2. The report is provided to the manager or supervisor of the area, WHSC and Institutional Head or District Director.
  4. Monitoring
    1. The information obtained from regular inspections should be reviewed carefully to determine where corrective action is needed.
    2. It should also serve to identify trends as part of overall monitoring of program effectiveness.
18. Accident Investigations
  1. An "accident" is defined as an event that results in a fatality, work injury, property damage or material loss arising out of, linked with or occurring in the course of employment.
  2. The primary purpose of an accident investigation is to establish the causes as quickly as possible through the identification and examination of all information associated with the accident.
  3. The ultimate purpose is to make the required changes in the work conditions and procedures that will eliminate or reduce the risk of a similar occurrence. (Part XIX - Hazard Prevention Program of the Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations)
  4. The supervisor in charge of the work will conduct the accident investigation with a member of the WHSC.
  5. If the accident is serious or complex, technical assistance may be brought in.
  6. The onus is on the injured or ill employee to inform a supervisor of an accident, incident or hazardous occurrence.
  7. The supervisor must ensure that it is reported to the Workers' Compensation Board (WCB), to HRSDC, if required, and to the WHSC.
  8. It is the responsibility of the supervisor of the work site:
    1. to either investigate or appoint a qualified person to conduct the investigation as soon as possible after the occurrence has been reported;
    2. to advise the WHSC within 24 hours of any hazardous occurrence and provide the name of the person appointed to investigate; and
    3. to take all measures to prevent a recurrence (Part XVII of the Treasury Board Occupational Health and Safety Directive).
  9. The Hazardous Occurrence Investigation Report (LAB 1070) will be completed in all instances where incidents require the mandatory participation of the WHSC.
    1. Copies of the report are sent to the WHSC members for their review.
    2. If the injury was disabling or if there was a requirement for outside medical treatment, the report must also be sent to HRSDC.
    3. If workers' compensation is being applied for, the employer must ensure that the appropriate WCB forms are completed (refer to Annex F).
  10. Records on employee injuries and hazardous occurrences must be kept for a period of ten years.
  11. The investigation should focus on a planned approach to identify the direct causes of the hazardous occurrence with the following sequence of actions:
    1. prevent the removal of evidence or the change of conditions at the work scene;
    2. determine the specified work procedure;
    3. verify evidence of the witnesses and, if possible, the involved employee;
    4. record the results of special tests or re-enactments;
    5. review and select findings and establish causes;
    6. recommend appropriate changes as well as preventative and corrective measures to eliminate, reduce and protect against the risks of accidents and incidents;
    7. ensure full completion of the Hazardous Occurrence Investigation Report (LAB 1070); and
    8. carry out the changes recommended to prevent a recurrence of the accident.
  12. Under the Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, HRSDC (Labour Program) must receive a copy of the Hazardous Occurrence Investigation Report (LAB 1070) under any one of the following circumstances:
    1. a fire or an explosion;
    2. an electric shock, toxic atmosphere or oxygen deficient atmosphere that caused an employee to lose consciousness;
    3. a disabling injury (which prevents the employee from reporting for work or from effectively performing all duties on any day subsequent to the day on which the injury occurred); and
    4. the implementation of rescue, revival or other similar emergency procedures.
  13. Under the following extreme circumstances, the accident is required to be reported to a Health and Safety Officer of HRSDC (Labour Program) by telephone or fax within 24 hours:
    1. a fatality;
    2. a disabling injury to two or more employees;
    3. the loss by an employee of a body member or a part thereof or the complete loss of usefulness of a body member, or a part thereof;
    4. the permanent impairment of a body function of an employee;
    5. an explosion;
    6. damage to a boiler or pressure vessel that results in fire or the rupture of the boiler or pressure vessel; and
    7. any damage to an elevating device that renders it unserviceable, or a free fall of an elevating device.
  14. It is the responsibility of the WHSC to ensure that all corrective or prevention recommendations are actioned.
19. Training
  1. Part II of the Canada Labour Code and Part XVI of the Treasury Board Occupational Health and Safety Directive require that the employer provide the information, instruction and training necessary to ensure health and safety at work.
  2. Training for WHSC members will be as follows:
    1. all newly appointed members will attend the three-day training program as outlined in CSC's National Training Standards which specify that this training is essential to ensure all new members acquire the knowledge necessary to fulfill their functions; and
    2. refresher training will be provided as required by WHSCs.
  3. Other training opportunities will be discussed at WHSC meetings and appropriate representatives selected accordingly.
20. First Aid and CPR/AED
  1. The Institutional Head or District Director is responsible for determining the appropriate number of designated staff in accordance with Part II of the Canada Labour Code and first aid and CPR/AED training will be provided as indicated in CSC’s National Training Standards. (Part XVI of the Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations and Part XVI of the Treasury Board Occupational Health and Safety Directive)
  2. The employer shall ensure that first aid attendants' certification is current. A list containing the names, certification level/status and the location of first aid attendants shall be maintained.
21. Year-End Report
  1. In accordance section 10 of the Safety and Health Committees and Representatives Regulations, Canada Labour Code,every WHSC will submit to the Regional Health and Safety Officer of HRSDC (Labour Program) a year-end report not later than March 1st in each year on the Committee's activities during the 12-month period ending December 31 of the previous year.
  2. The report will be prepared on HRSDC’s form LAB 1058, entitled "Workplace Committee Report", and signed by both chairpersons.
  3. A copy of this report is also to be sent to the Regional Occupational Health and Safety Coordinator for roll-up to the National Occupational Health and Safety Coordinator, in accordance with CSC policy.
  4. As soon as possible after submitting the report, a copy will be posted for a period of two months at the facility.
22. Communication
  1. WHSCs will communicate with resource people and request external support, guidance and training as required.
  2. Committees may liaise with other WHSCs within their region and within CSC.
23. Entitlement

Time spent attending Committee meetings, including reasonable preparation time, and carrying out functions as a member of the Committee will be deemed time spent at work.

24. Liability

No member of a WHSC is personally liable for anything done or omitted to be done by him or her in good faith.


WORKPLACE INSPECTION RECORDING FORM
(EXAMPLE)

Inspection Location:  ________________________

Date of Inspection:  _________________________

Department/Area Covered:  ___________________

Time of Inspection:  _________________________

Item (and Location of Hazard) Hazard(s)
Observed
Repeat
Item
Recommended
Action
Responsible
Person
Action
Taken
Date
    Yes No        




           

Inspected by:

     ____________________________

     ____________________________

     ____________________________

Copies to:
     Workplace Health and Safety Committee
     Area Manager or Supervisor   
     Institutional Head or District Director

 

WORKPLACE INSPECTION MEMO
(EXAMPLE)

DATE:    _________________

LOCATION:
________________________________________

________________________________________

________________________________________

The following deficiency(ies) has (have) been noted:
________________________________________

________________________________________

________________________________________

________________________________________

________________________________________

The accident and/or health problem potential is:
________________________________________

________________________________________

________________________________________

________________________________________

We recommend the following correction(s):
________________________________________

________________________________________

________________________________________

________________________________________

________________________________________

________________________________________

WORKPLACE HEALTH AND SAFETY COMMITTEE INSPECTORS

___________________________     ___________________________
Name (please print)                       Name (please print)

___________________________     ___________________________
Signature                                    Signature


COPIES TO:

Section supervisor _________________________________

Area Manager _________________________________

WHSC (for review and follow-up)

Note: Prior to the inadequate situation being permanently corrected, the supervisor must take immediate corrective action if required. This note will be reviewed at the next WHSC meeting.

Section supervisor’s report to WHSC (c/o AWMS)

The following corrective action(s) has (have) been taken:
________________________________________

________________________________________

________________________________________

________________________________________

Section supervisor ________________________

Date ____________________



Annex C

Telework

POLICY OBJECTIVES

  1. To provide a consistent approach in implementing telework requests and to ensure that all necessary steps are taken to provide a healthy and secure work environment to teleworkers.

  2. To ensure that CSC telework agreements are in accordance with the Treasury Board Telework Policy.

AUTHORITIES

  1. Commissioner's Directive 254 - Occupational Safety and Health and Return to Work Programs

    Treasury Board Telework Policy

    Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations

CROSS-REFERENCES

  1. Guidelines 254-2 - Return to Work Program

    Commissioner's Directive 568 - Management of Security Information

    Commissioner's Directive 226 - Use of Electronic Resources

    Privacy Act

    Policy on Access to Information

DEFINITIONS

  1. Telework: a work arrangement performed at a distance from the official workplace. This arrangement is an authorized agreement where employees perform all or part of their regular work away from their official workplace. It can be performed on a regular or episodic basis. It can be performed on a full time or part time basis or a few days a week.

  2. Official workplace: the place where the employee would work if there were no telework situation. This usually refers to the CSC office where the employee normally works.

  3. Telework place: a location, other than the official workplace, where the employee is permitted to work as well as the location at which the employee and the employer have mutually agreed the employee will work. This can refer to any location where work can be performed and does not necessarily refer to an employee's home. At CSC, the telework place will usually refer to the employee's home.

RESPONSIBILITIES

  1. The unit head or his/her delegate is responsible for :

    1. visiting the telework place with the employee's consent to ensure that it is safe and secure;
    2. providing necessary work equipment and supplies such as a computer, printer, pen, binder, paper, but not including furniture such as a desk and chair; and
    3. completing a threat risk assessment.
  2. The employee is responsible for:

    1. requesting a telework arrangement in writing;
    2. providing a safe and secure physical telework place;
    3. providing information on nearest emergency services (i.e. telephone number of police services and fire protection service if 911 service is not available);
    4. providing necessary contact information to the unit head or his/her delegate;
    5. providing basic office furniture such as a desk and chair;
    6. the cost of maintaining the telework place, such as insurance, heat and hydro;
    7. respecting the terms and conditions of employment, relevant collective agreements, legislation, and Treasury Board and departmental policies at the telework place; and
    8. using equipment and electronic networks belonging to the employer only for the purposes of carrying out the employer's work unless otherwise authorized by the unit head or his/her delegate.

TELEWORK AGREEMENT

  1. There needs to be a signed agreement between the employee and the unit head or his/her delegate for all telework arrangements.

  2. This agreement will be for non-recurrent arrangements of a week or more and will include:

    1. a threat risk assessment;
    2. work objectives and expected results;
    3. location of telework place;
    4. work schedule;
    5. list of work equipment needed to meet work objectives;
    6. health and safety assessment, hazards recognition, fire safety, ergonomics, lighting, air quality, etc.;
    7. cost effectiveness assessment (all agreements should be cost effective, or at least cost neutral);
    8. start-up cost will be absorbed in the first year of the agreement; and
    9. duration of arrangement.
  3. All agreements will be reviewed and renewed yearly if the duration of the agreement is longer than a year.

  4. A telework arrangement can be terminated at any time, with reasonable notice by either party.

SECURITY

  1. Equipment and documents will be kept in a secure area or storage place.

  2. Computer access will be password protected.

  3. The unit head or his/her delegate will ensure that all security concerns are dealt with if the telework arrangement is to be implemented.

  4. National interest information classified as Confidential, Secret, and Top Secret and information designated as Protected C must not be transported to and from, transmitted over regular phone lines to and from, processed, stored and/or disposed of in a telework place without the approval of senior management. Upon approval, employees or managers will contact their Regional Manager, Information Technology Security or their Physical Security Officer to obtain guidance on the standards to follow.

  5. Hardcopy information designated as Protected A and B will be secured in a locked container such as a filing cabinet or will be placed in a locked briefcase.

  6. Protected A and B hardcopy information must be disposed of on CSC premises only.

  7. Protected A and B information will be transported discreetly in a sealed envelope or briefcase with no security marking.

  8. For document transmittal within Canada:

    1. Protected A documents will be placed inside an envelope bearing only the address and delivered by first class mail, an authorized person or reliable courier;
    2. Protected B documents will be placed in an envelope bearing both the address and the security marking. Add "To be opened by (person or position title) only" if warranted. Insert in a larger envelope bearing the address only. Security markings will not appear on the outer envelope. Send by reliable courier service or an authorized person.
  9. For more information, refer to the Information Security Requirements.

EQUIPMENT

  1. Equipment and electronic network requirements for any telework arrangement will be decided upon on a case by case basis and an agreement reached between the employer and the employee prior to undertaking a telework situation.

  2. Where the employer provides the equipment, the employer will assume the responsibility for normal maintenance and repair.

  3. If the employee request the telework arrangement using his or her own equipment, the employee is responsible for the maintenance and repair.

  4. The employee will immediately report any equipment failure to his or her direct supervisor.

  5. The employee will report any loss or theft of equipment to his or her direct supervisor.

  6. The employee will not be using any other equipment or software other than those provided by the employer, unless agreed to by the employer and employee.

  7. The employee will obtain and pay for the high-speed Internet connection, if required, at the telework location.

WORKPLACE ACCIDENTS/INCIDENTS

  1. All telework place accidents or incidents will be reported to the immediate supervisor as per the official workplace process.



Annex D

Hazardous Occurrence Investigation Report
(FORM LAB 1070)

  1. According to section 15.8 of the Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, the employer will without delay report in writing all information required on form LAB 1070, including the results of the investigation referred to in paragraph 15.4(1)(a) where the investigation discloses that a hazardous occurrence resulted in one of the following:

    1. a disabling injury to an employee;
    2. an electric shock, toxic atmosphere or oxygen deficient atmosphere that caused an employee to lose consciousness;
    3. the implementation of rescue, revival or other similar emergency procedures; or
    4. a fire or an explosion.
  2. A copy of form LAB 1070 shall, without delay, be forwarded by the employer to the Workplace Health and Safety Committee or representative.

  3. Within 14 days after the hazardous occurrence, a copy of form LAB 1070 shall be submitted by the employer to the Regional Health and Safety Officer at the regional or district office.

  4. In the case of an accident involving a motor vehicle on a public road that is investigated by a police authority and results in a situation as referred to in paragraph 1, the employer shall within 14 days after receipt of the police report, submit a copy of this report as outlined in paragraph 3.

  5. The form to be used, Hazardous Occurrence Investigation Report (LAB 1070), is published by HRSDC (Labour Program).



Annex E

What a Supervisor Should Do if an Accident, Illness or Near Miss Occurs



Annex E1

Response to Incidents Involving an Employee Medical Emergency - Employer Checklist

FIP PROTECTED B ONCE COMPLETED
   
RESPONSE TO INCIDENTS INVOLVING AN EMPLOYEE MEDICAL EMERGENCY - EMPLOYER CHECKLIST PUT AWAY ON ADMINISTRATIVE OR OPERATIONAL FILE
 
Facility Incident date
(YY-MM-DD)
Time of
notification
Incident type  
         
Employee name Reported to
   
Completed by
 
Print name and initials ► Signature Position
Alerted by Notes
   
A duly trained and CPR certified employee will immediately provide first aid assistance whenever a medical crisis situation arises.
On being informed of a possible medical emergency, the employer will complete the following actions.

ACTIONS   Initials Time Date
(YY-MM-D)
         
1. Note time when notified of the incident and obtain as much information as possible about the nature of the incident      
         
Comments
         
2. If necessary, ensure additional staff are immediately deployed to the scene of the incident      
         
Comments
         
3. Call Health Services (insert phone number) during hours when the Health Centre is open
     
         
Comments
         
4.
  • If employee requires medical treatment, ensure transportation to either a physician or hospital as appropriate
  • If required, immediately call 911 to summon the ambulance service *
  • If employee is able to respond, ask if he or she wishes to be accompanied to a treatment facility and organize accordingly
  • For all head injuries and chest pains, the employee will be transported to hospital by ambulance
     
NOTE: In case of a post-exposure prophylactic treatment (Protocol 821-1), the employee will be accompanied to the nearest hospital or clinic where arrangements have been made to deal with such an incident.
*Any ambulance or other transportation cost will be assumed by the employer.
         
Comments
         
5. Ensure appropriate security is in place to protect staff on site, responding staff, ambulance attendants and offenders      
         
Comments
         
6. Assess the situation and if necessary secure the institution      
         
Comments
         
7. Confirm first aid/CPR is being administered and if required, transport the employee(s) to the Health Centre or to a pre-determined location for pick up by the ambulance, using a wheelchair or stretcher (Emergency Aid 14 or 15)      
         
Comments
         
CSC/SCC 1323-04 (R-2009-03)
(Word Version) Page 1 of 2
Personal information will be protected under the provisions of the Privacy Act. DISTRIBUTION    
Copy 1  
Copy 2  
         
8. Advise Institutional Head of the situation      
         
Comments
         
9. Ensure the employee(s) involved or witness complete the Officer’s Statement/Observation Report (CSC/SCC 0875) prior to leaving the institution for the day or as soon as possible upon returning to the work site
     
         
Comments
         
10. Offer Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) to staff, and provide support services to inmates affected by the emergency      
         
Comments
         
11. Ensure that the incident is recorded officially as:
  1. an Occurrence on the Shift Report
  2. in the Health/Safety Module of the Human Resource Management System (HRMS)
     
         
Comments
         
12.

Ensure completion of the following reports in a timely fashion:

  1. Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Hazardous Occurrence Investigation Report (form LAB 1070), which must be sent to HRSDC in specific cases specified in Part II of CLC
  2. Workers’ Compensation Board Report of Accident/Illness (see Annex F)
  3. Forward a copy of the HRSDC Hazardous Occurrence Investigation Report to the Workplace Health and Safety Committee or representative (see Annexes D and E)
     
         
Comments
         
13. Review all reports and ensure: all sections have been completed; writing is legible; all staff members are identified by LAST and FIRST names (including their respective position TITLES); and use of abbreviations is avoided      
         
Comments
         
14. Notify next-of-kin as required      
         
Comments
         
15. If employee is unable to perform his or her duties or must be hospitalized, redeploy staff or arrange for additional staff to come in      
         
Comments
         
16. In the event of MEDIA inquiries, refer all questions to the institution’s Media Relations Officer      
         
Comments
         
17. If required, advise duty officer      
         
Comments
         
18. If required, notify the police      
         
Comments
         
19. Contact operational unit head or delegate to arrange for the clean-up of body fluids if required but ONLY AFTER the police or coroner has released the scene of the incident      
         
Comments
         
20. Ensure compliance with all other policies and procedures related to the handling of incidents      
         
Comments
         
CSC/SCC 1323-04 (R-2009-03) (Word Version) Page 2 of 2


Annex F

Provincial WCB Forms to be Filled Out by the Employer

Provincial WCB Forms to be Filled Out by the Employer
Province

Number Title of Form
Newfoundland F7 Employer’s Report of Injury
Prince Edward Island F7 Employer’s Report of Accident
Nova Scotia F67-9 *WCB Accident Report
New Brunswick F67 *Report of Accident or Occupational Disease
Quebec 1940-A Employer’s Notice and Reimbursement Claim
Ontario F7 *Employer’s Report of Injury/Disease
Manitoba   Employer’s Incident Report
Saskatchewan E1 Employer’s Initial Report of Injury
Alberta   Employer’s Report of Injury or Occupational Disease
British Columbia F7 Employer’s Report of Injury or Occupational Disease
Yukon   Employer’s Report of Injury/Illness
Northwest Territories   Employer’s Report of Accident

* Both worker and employer must fill out the form.

These forms are available at the Association of Workers’ Compensation Boards of Canada.



Annex G

Respiratory Protection in CSC

OBJECTIVE

  1. To ensure the safety of staff and offenders who may be required to use a respirator under normal or emergency conditions by establishing a respiratory protection program within CSC.

AUTHORITIES

  1. Corrections and Conditional Release Act, paragraph 5 (a) and section 70

    Corrections and Conditional Release Regulations, section 83

    Part II of the Canada Labour Code

    Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations

CROSS-REFERENCES

  1. Treasury Board Occupational Health and Safety Directive, Part XII - Personal and Protective Equipment and Clothing

    Treasury Board Occupational Health Evaluation Standard

    Treasury Board Policy on the Duty to Accommodate Persons With Disabilities in the Federal Public Service

    Commissioner's Directive 254 - Occupational Safety and Health and Return to Work Programs

    Commissioner's Directive 345 - Fire Safety

    CSC Fire Safety Manual

    CSA Standard Z94.4-02 - Selection, Use and Care of Respirators

    CSA Standard Z180.1-00 - Compressed Breathing Air and Systems

REQUIREMENTS

  1. In accordance with legislation and accepted best practices, the CSC will establish and maintain a respiratory protection program meeting the requirements of CSA Standard Z94.4-02 - Selection, Use and Care of Respirators at all of its operational sites that require the use of respirators under normal or emergency conditions.

  2. At a minimum, the program will contain the following elements:

    1. roles and responsibilities;
    2. hazard assessment;
    3. selection of appropriate respirators;
    4. respirator fit testing;
    5. training;
    6. use of respirators;
    7. cleaning, maintenance, and storage of respirators;
    8. health surveillance of respirator users;
    9. program evaluation; and
    10. record keeping.

RESPONSIBILITIES

  1. The Assistant Commissioner, Corporate Services, through the Technical Services Branch, will establish the requirements for respiratory protection in operational units. To assist in the implementation of respiratory protection in CSC, the Assistant Commissioner, Corporate Services, in conjunction with the Assistant Commissioner, Correctional Operations and Programs, who will provide input on operational issues, and the Assistant Commissioner, Human Resource Management, who will provide input on labour relations and occupational health and safety, will issue such documents as necessary.

  2. Regional Deputy Commissioners will support, monitor, and report on respiratory protection in operational units within their region.

  3. Institutional Heads, whose operational unit requires the use of respirators under normal or emergency conditions, will ensure the operation of an appropriate respiratory protection program within their facility that includes the elements outlined in paragraph 5 of this document.

  4. Institutional Heads will assign specific responsibilities related to respiratory protection to:

    1. respiratory protection program administrator, who will be responsible for overall administration of the program, including the compliance with the requirements of CSA Standard Z94.4-02 - Selection, Use and Care of Respirators and CSA Standard Z180.1-00 - Compressed Breathing Air and Systems;
    2. respirator users, who will comply with the requirements of CSA Standard Z94.4-02 - Selection, Use and Care of Respirators and with written procedures established for the program in effect at the operational unit;
    3. supervisor of the respirator user, who will ensure the user complies with the requirements of CSA Standard Z94.4-02 - Selection, Use and Care of Respirators and with written procedures established for the program in effect at the operational unit;
    4. person selecting respirators, who will be responsible to ensure the appropriate respirators are selected for the hazards identified in the workplace assessments;
    5. training coordinator, who will ensure that all persons having roles or responsibilities in the respiratory protection program receive the necessary training to enable them to safely and correctly perform their duties;
    6. fit-tester, who will conduct quantitative fit-tests appropriate for those respirators selected for use in the workplace, create and maintain fit-test records of respirator users, and create and maintain records of maintenance, calibration and repair of fit-test equipment;
    7. the person issuing respirators, who will be responsible to issue only those respirators for which the user has been qualified;
    8. the respirator maintenance personnel, who will inspect, maintain and repair respirators in accordance with written instructions and the manufacturer's instructions; and
    9. the health care professional, who will:
      1. be knowledgeable of the health effects associated with the respiratory hazards to which the user may be exposed,
      2. be knowledgeable of the physiological and psychological stresses associated with use of the selected respirator under the anticipated working conditions,
      3. assess the suitability of the user to safely use the selected respirator or respirators, and
      4. report to the respiratory protection program administrator whether the user meets medical requirements, meets medical requirements with limitations, or does not meet medical requirements to safely use the selected respirator(s).
  5. In many operational units, one person may fulfil more than one defined role and be assigned multiple responsibilities in the respiratory protection program.

HAZARD ASSESSMENT

  1. The respiratory protection program administrator will ensure that a hazard assessment of the work area is performed by a qualified person to determine the respiratory hazards present and to assist in the selection of an appropriate means to mitigate those hazards. Respirators will only be used where engineering or administrative control measures are not practicable or not adequate, while such controls are being instituted, or during shutdown for maintenance, repair, or emergency.

SELECTION OF APPROPRIATE RESPIRATORS

  1. Respirators will be selected in accordance with the selection process outlined in CSA Standard Z94.4-02 - Selection, Use and Care of Respirators.

RESPIRATOR FIT-TESTING

  1. Persons using respirators requiring a tight face to facepiece seal will successfully pass a quantitative fit-test administered in accordance with CSA Standard Z94.4-02 - Selection, Use and Care of Respirators. The fit-test will be carried out:

    1. after completing the health surveillance evaluation;
    2. prior to initial practical training on the specific respirator(s); and
    3. prior to refresher training.
  2. Fit-testing may be necessary at other times due to changes in the workplace requiring the selection of a different respirator, or due to changes in the user's physical condition, which could affect his or her ability to achieve an effective face to facepiece seal.

  3. The person conducting the fit-test will not perform the test unless the person undergoing the fit test is clean-shaven where the facepiece seals to the face. For males, moustaches are permitted provided the hair does not extend beyond the corners of the mouth.

FACTORS AFFECTING THE FACE TO FACEPIECE SEAL

  1. To achieve an effective face to facepiece seal, users will be clean-shaven throughout the entire facial area where the facepiece seals to the face, including the forehead, temples, cheeks, jawline, under chin and neck. The chin cup of the facepiece is considered part of the sealing surface.

  2. Sidearms on glasses or any other materials such as cloth, tissue, straps, jewellery, facial hair, etc., will not pass between the face and the sealing surface of the facepiece, or interfere with the seal of the tight-fitting facepiece, or interfere with the operation of the respirator.

  3. Where corrective lenses are required by the respirator user, these will be provided by the employer and installed in accordance with the respirator manufacturer's instructions.

  4. Provision of prescription lenses for mounting in the respirator manufacturer's lens appliance will be in accordance with local optical supply procurement arrangements.

TRAINING

  1. The Institutional Head will ensure that persons assigned responsibilities in the respiratory protection program are qualified to perform their duties as outlined in CSA Standard Z94.4-02 - Selection, Use and Care of Respirators.

  2. Respirator users will receive initial and refresher training in the safe use of those respirators, which they may be required to use under normal or emergency conditions in the workplace. Refresher training will be conducted annually.

USE OF RESPIRATORS

  1. The need to be able to safely use a respirator has been identified as a requirement for many security posts. Certain security posts (including Security Control Posts, Living Unit Control Posts, Main Communications and Control Posts and others) may require staff to don and use self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or air purifying respirators (gas masks) during normal or emergency conditions.

  2. The various hazards may include fire, use of chemical agents (tear gas, etc.), hazardous atmospheres due to manufacturing, biological processes, maintenance, equipment malfunction, or chemical leaks or spills.

OPERATIONAL REQUIREMENTS

  1. To ensure the safety of respirator users and those that depend on them for their safety, the following requirements must be satisfied:

    1. In conjunction with the workplace respiratory hazard assessment required above, the respiratory protection program administrator will ensure that all security posts that may require the use of respirators under normal or emergency conditions are clearly identified in Post Orders.
    2. Other areas identified as requiring or possibly requiring the use of respirators (e.g. industrial shops, process areas, confined spaces, sewage treatment areas, farm silos, granaries, manure pits, etc.) will be clearly identified by signage and in written operating procedures.
  2. In accordance with the results of the hazard assessments, the respiratory protection program administrator will specify in Post Orders and other written procedures, which respirator or respirators will be used for the anticipated hazards to which workers on a post or other identified area may be exposed.

  3. The Institutional Head will ensure that all positions in security posts or other identified areas requiring the possible use of respirators under normal or emergency conditions are clearly identified.

  4. The Institutional Head will ensure that only those persons medically qualified, fit-tested and trained to use the respirators necessary in a security post or other identified area perform the duties of that post or area. This may require the establishment of special rosters or dedicated response teams.

  5. The duty Correctional Manager will keep a list of correctional staff who are qualified to use respirators and any limitations as to type and duties they may perform while using the respirators.

  6. Persons who are required to be capable of using respirators will undergo an initial medical assessment that addresses the potential impact the use of the respirator or respirators could have on the individual. This assessment may require a further health evaluation by a health care professional. All information resulting from the assessment will be treated as medically confidential.

  7. Quantitative fit-tests will be performed on all CSC staff and offenders who are required to be capable of using a respirator and records of the results of these tests will be maintained by the institutions. Qualified and fit-tested respirator users will be issued a card indicating the make, model and size of respirator(s) for which they are qualified and they will use only this or these respirator(s) if approved for the hazard in question.

  8. Staff who are required to be capable of using respirators must be advised that they are to be clean-shaven where the facepiece seals to the face at all times while on duty. If employees work extended hours and develop facial hair that degrades the face to facepiece seal, they will be afforded time to shave and bring their facial seal into compliance.

  9. Supervisors will call for ad-hoc fit-tests for any individuals whose facial hair or other condition is suspected of preventing an airtight seal between the face and respirator for those respirators requiring a tight face to facepiece seal.

CLEANING, MAINTENANCE AND STORAGE OF RESPIRATORS

  1. Respirators will be cleaned, maintained and stored in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions and the requirements of CSA Standard Z94.4-02 - Selection, Use and Care of Respirators.

  2. In the case of self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) and air-line respirators, air cylinders will be maintained in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions and filled with air meeting the requirements of CSA Standard Z180.1-00 - Compressed Breathing Air and Systems.

HEALTH SURVEILLANCE AND EVALUATION OF RESPIRATOR USERS

  1. In accordance with the requirements of the Treasury Board Occupational Health Evaluation Standard, prior to initial respirator use and periodically thereafter, the respiratory protection program administrator will determine if a person may be assigned to use or to continue to use a respirator.

  2. The respiratory protection program administrator will ensure that documentation is completed which confirms that the individual is free from any physiological or psychological condition which may preclude him or her from being assigned the use of a selected respirator.

  3. A screening form for respirator users may assist in identifying any such condition. The Health Canada OHAG Form 4 - Self Declaration Questionnaire - Respiratory Users (HC/SC 9135) (included at the end of this annex) will be completed by respirator users prior to initial and refresher training.

  4. Where the respiratory protection program administrator or user is concerned that a physiological or psychological condition exists which may preclude the safe use of a respirator, an opinion from a health care professional will be obtained regarding that person's ability to use a respirator.

  5. This opinion will be obtained before the person is permitted to use a respirator or if a change in conditions warrants an additional opinion.

  6. To assist the health care professional in assessing the respirator user, the Health Canada OHAG Form 1 - Assessment of Medical Fitness to Use a Respirator (HC/SC 3321) (included at the end of this annex) will be completed by the respiratory protection program administrator.

  7. The report from the health care professional that is provided to the respiratory protection program administrator will not disclose the nature of the condition but will indicate that the user meets medical requirements, meets medical requirements with limitations, or does not meet medical requirements to use the selected respirator. Where limitations are imposed, these will be explicitly stated in the written opinion.

  8. All health information will be treated as medically confidential.

PROGRAM EVALUATION

  1. The respiratory protection program administrator will ensure that the program is periodically reviewed to ensure that it is being managed effectively and that ultimately respirator users are being adequately protected.

  2. The program review may range from an informal evaluation to a formal audit with accompanying report depending on the level of workplace risk that may be present and the scope and depth of the evaluation desired.

  3. Deficiencies and non-compliance will be identified and appropriate corrective action taken without delay.

RECORD KEEPING

  1. The respiratory protection program administrator will ensure that appropriate records are kept of all respiratory protection program activities as required by applicable legislation, CSC procedures and CSA Standard Z94.4-02 - Selection, Use and Care of Respirators.

ISSUES OF NON-COMPLIANCE

  1. Staff who have a temporary or permanent health condition that precludes them from safely using a respirator or respirators will be accommodated in accordance with the Treasury Board Policy on the Duty to Accommodate Persons With Disabilities in the Federal Public Service.

  2. Those persons whose duties require compliance with CSA Standard Z94.4-02 - Selection, Use and Care of Respirators, and who choose not to be in compliance, threaten their own health and safety and the health and safety of others who depend on them under normal or emergency conditions.

  3. Such persons, who choose not to comply, will be removed from the post or other identified area and counselled regarding the potential penalties for non-compliance under section 148 - Offences and Punishment of the Canada Labour Code and the Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations. If they continue to refuse to comply, they will be referred without delay for corrective action, which may include the disciplinary process.

  4. Questions regarding these requirements will be directed to the Director General, Technical Services, at National Headquarters.

OHAG FORM - 4

FORM

Examples of Acceptable and Unacceptable Facial Hair for Tight-Fitting Half-Mask and Full Facepiece Respirators

Acceptable

Extremely closely shaven hair, ideal for fit testing and seal. Acceptable - extremely closely shaven hair

Acceptable level of shaving will typically provide good seal. Acceptable - acceptable level of shaving

Half face: Acceptable
Reason: Hair is not in the sealing region.

Full face: Acceptable
Reason: Same

Acceptable - moustache

Half face: Acceptable
Reason: Hair is not in the sealing region.

Full face: Acceptable
Reason: Same

Acceptable - thick moustache

Unacceptable

Half face: Unacceptable
Reason: This amount of “shadow” is marginal for good sealing during fit testing and would cause exposure to a hazardous atmosphere under working conditions.

Full face: Unacceptable
Reason: Same

Unacceptable - shadow

Half face: Unacceptable
Reason: Hair is not in the sealing region, however variations of styles and length could compromise sealing region and exhalation valve.

Full face: Unacceptable
Reason: Same

Unacceptable - hair is not in the sealing region

Half face: Unacceptable
Reason: The “five o’clock shadow” would fail this person.

Full face: Unacceptable
Reason: Same

Unacceptable - five o’clock shadow

Half face: Unacceptable
Reason: Hair from the moustache is not in the sealing region; however, the “five o’clock shadow” would fail this person.

Full face: Unacceptable
Reason: Same

Unacceptable - hair from the moustache is not in the sealing region

Half face: Unacceptable
Reason: Hair from the moustache is not in the sealing region. However, the heavy “five o’clock shadow” would fail this person.

Full face: Unacceptable
Reason: Same

Unacceptable - hair from the moustache is not in the sealing region

Half face: Unacceptable
Reason: Hair is in sealing region under the chin and on the side of the face.

Full face: Unacceptable
Reason: Same

Unacceptable - hair is in sealing region under the chin and on the side of the face

Half face: Unacceptable
Reason: Hair is in sealing region under the chin.

Full face: Unacceptable
Reason: Same

Unacceptable - hair is in sealing region under the chin

Half face: Unacceptable
Reason: Hair is in sealing region under the chin and on the cheeks.

Full face: Unacceptable
Reason: Same

Unacceptable - hair is in sealing region under the chin and on the cheeks

Half face: Unacceptable
Reason: Hair is in sealing region under the chin.

Full face: Unacceptable
Reason: Same

Unacceptable - hair is in sealing region under the chin

Half face: Unacceptable
Reason: Hair is in sealing region under the chin.

Full face: Unacceptable
Reason: Same

Unacceptable - hair is in sealing region under the chin

Half face: Unacceptable
Reason: The heavy hair in sealing region under the chin would prevent a good seal.

Full face: Unacceptable
Reason: Same

Unacceptable - heavy hair in sealing region under chin

Half face: Unacceptable
Reason: Hair would likely block the sealing region or entangle with the valves.

Full face: Unacceptable
Reason: Same
 

Unacceptable - long moustache

Half face: Unacceptable
Reason: Hair would likely block the sealing region or entangle with the valves.

Full face: Unacceptable
Reason: Same

Unacceptable - very long moustache

Half face: Unacceptable
Reason: A beard of this size would preclude any chances of a good seal.

Full face: Unacceptable
Reason: Same

Unacceptable - long beard

Half face: Unacceptable
eason: A beard of this size would preclude any chances of a good seal.

Full face: Unacceptable
Reason: Same

Unacceptable - very long beard


Annex H

Protective Footwear

POLICY OBJECTIVES

  1. To identify protective footwear entitlements for employees of the CSC, including footwear required for occupational health, safety and/or cleanliness.

  2. To ensure that CSC employees who wear protective footwear do so in a manner consistent with the manufacturer's instructions in order to benefit from the full protective benefits for which the footwear is designed. This would include the selection, care and maintenance of the protective footwear.

  3. To ensure that the most appropriate protective footwear is identified based upon the workplace environment, potential hazards and specific occupational activities to reduce the risk of foot injuries.

AUTHORITIES

  1. Treasury Board Occupational Health and Safety Directive, Part XII - Personal and Protective Equipment and Clothing

    Treasury Board Uniforms Directive

    Part II of the Canada Labour Code

    Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations

CROSS-REFERENCES

  1. Commissioner's Directive 254 - Occupational Safety and Health and Return to Work Programs

    Commissioner's Directive 351 - Employee Clothing Entitlements

    Guidelines 351-1 - CSC Uniforms, Dress Code and Scale of Issue

    CSA Standard Z195-02 - Protective Footwear

    CSA Standard Z195.1-02 - Guideline on Selection, Care and Use of Protective Footwear

RESPONSIBILITIES

  1. The Institutional Head will ensure that sufficient funding is available to meet all protective footwear requirements. Local purchases of protective footwear will be funded from the individual Materiel Management or Institutional Services budget.

  2. Local managers and supervisors, in consultation with the Workplace Health and Safety Committee, are responsible for identifying positions requiring protective footwear and determining the specific type of protection to be used in accordance with CSA Standard Z195-02 - Protective Footwear.

  3. Managers and supervisors are also responsible for ensuring that employees occupying positions that have been determined to require protective footwear, wear their protective footwear at all times while performing those tasks with the inherent risk.

  4. All CSC employees are responsible for the care, safekeeping and appropriate use of protective footwear required in the performance of their duties.

ENTITLEMENTS

  1. 10. To determine protective footwear entitlements, a hazard assessment and analysis must be conducted. This assessment is based upon the workplace environment, potential hazards and specific occupational activities.

  2. If a hazard cannot be eliminated or controlled within safe limits, the use of protective footwear may prevent any injury or reduce its severity.

  3. The selection of footwear will depend on the results of the assessment and the protection required.

  4. Some work environments may contain multiple hazards and certain groups of jobs may not require the same footwear. An example of additional factors requiring protective measures is an electrical hazard on a wet floor. (See CSA Standard Z195.1-02 - Guideline on Selection, Care and Use of Protective Footwear, Section 5 - Selection Guide.)

  5. The footwear approved for purchase by the employee must be annotated with the appropriate identification in accordance with CSA Standard Z195.1-02 - Guideline on Selection, Care and Use of Protective Footwear. In most instances, this will be the green or white triangle with the Omega symbol.

  6. As the determination of protective footwear type must be specific to the work and the workplace, the final decision rests with the Institutional Head.

  7. The Workplace Health and Safety Committee or representative will participate in the implementation and monitoring of the locally authorized personal protective footwear program.

  8. The National Health and Safety Policy Committee will be consulted regarding the implementation and monitoring of the protective footwear program, when necessary (e.g. a high incident of foot injuries).

SELECTION, CARE AND MAINTENANCE

  1. The employee wearing the protective footwear is responsible for ensuring a proper fit when selecting and purchasing the protective footwear.

  2. The employee is also responsible for obtaining any required inserts, which are at the expense of the employee (e.g. arch supports, orthotics).

  3. The manufacturer's instructions must be adhered to in order to ensure the full protective benefits of the footwear.

  4. Proper care and maintenance will extend the effectiveness of protective footwear. The manufacturer's instructions will outline proper storage, cleaning and care of footwear.

REPLACEMENT FREQUENCY

  1. The normal replacement cycle for protective footwear will be every two years. However, in cases of exceptional wear or damage to footwear, replacement can occur earlier provided the footwear is inspected by management and is determined to be unusable.

  2. Reimbursement within two years of the last purchase will only be provided for work related wear or damage. Reimbursement will not be provided for lost or misplaced footwear.

REIMBURSEMENT PROCESS

  1. Reimbursement for the purchase of required protective footwear will be provided to employees.

  2. There is no specific cost limit for protective footwear; however a valid proof of purchase is required.

  3. The reimbursement will be processed upon the receipt of the proof of purchase. The proof of purchase is to be an original receipt indicating the date, item purchased and cost.

  4. For purchases of footwear within two years of the last purchase, written confirmation from the manager indicating that the previous footwear was examined and found to be in need of replacement is required for reimbursement.

  5. The line object code to be used for reimbursement of protective footwear is 07856.

ENQUIRIES

  1. Questions regarding these requirements will be directed to the Regional Occupational Health and Safety Coordinators.



Annex I

AUTOMATED EXTERNAL DEFIBRILLATORS (AEDs)

OBJECTIVES

  1. To promote the well-being of persons within CSC facilities by having an automated external defibrillator (AED) program in place. The purpose of this program is to provide reasonable access to an AED in the event of a cardiac emergency.

  2. To outline the proper procedures for AED inspection, maintenance, cleaning and storage.

  3. To describe the steps to follow after an event occurred when an AED was involved, including the downloading of data and the management of the Post-Rescue Medical Report.

AUTHORITIES

  1. Commissioner's Directive 800 - Health Services

    Protocol 821-1 - Post-Exposure Protocol (PEP) for Managing Significant Exposure to Blood and/or Body Fluids

    Guidelines 821-3 - Cleaning Blood and/or Other Body Fluid Spills

    Canada Labour Code, Part II

    Part XVI of the Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations

    Health Canada Standards

DEFINITION

  1. Institutional Head: the most senior manager in charge of the institution or workplace.

REQUIREMENTS

  1. The CSC shall establish and maintain an AED program at all of its facilities.

  2. This document describes the requirements with regard to:

    1. roles and responsibilities;
    2. training;
    3. user of defibrillators;
    4. maintenance and storage of defibrillators;
    5. replacement of consumables;
    6. procedures to be followed, including data downloads after operation of the AED; and
    7. management and distribution of the Post-Rescue Medical Report (CSC/SCC 1323-05 or 1323-06).

RESPONSIBILITIES

  1. The Assistant Commissioner, Corporate Services, through the Technical Services Branch, has established the requirements for the CSC AED program.

  2. The Assistant Commissioner, Corporate Services, in conjunction with the Assistant Commissioner, Correctional Operations and Programs, shall provide input on operational issues.

  3. The National Headquarters Technical Services Branch shall be responsible for:

    1. the development of technical specifications and requirements for AEDs;
    2. all contracting for goods and services relating to AED program implementation (this includes the acquisition of AED devices, AED training units and consumable supplies to provide initial training for all sites); and
    3. the initial acquisition of wall mounted cabinets and AED signs through CORCAN for implementation of the AED program. These wall cabinets and AED signs shall be provided to all sites and installation shall be coordinated locally between the Regional Headquarters and CORCAN.
  4. Institutional Heads or designates shall ensure procedures are in place with regard to AED use, routine checks, inspections, maintenance and replenishing of all AED consumable supplies for the ongoing use of the AED equipment within their facility. These procedures shall include the requirements outlined in paragraph 7.

  5. Institutional Heads or designates shall assign specific responsibilities related to the AEDs. These responsibilities shall include, but not be limited to, the following:

    1. Assistant Wardens of Management Services (AWMS) in institutions, Unit Heads in offices and Chiefs of Health Services in Health Centres shall be responsible for the overall administration of the AED program. This includes:
      1. regular inspections to ensure the AED units are operational, in good working order and have not been tampered with;
      2. ensuring that consumable supplies are available and within the expiry date; and
      3. ensuring that batteries, contact pads, etc. are replaced when required.
    2. AED users shall primarily consist of trained staff members who have met CSC training standards on first aid and CPR (which includes the AED). However, in an emergency situation, a user will not be absolutely required to have had training, since the AED device provides directions to guide the rescuer in the proper steps and safe usage. Every attempt will be made to have a number of staff trained in the use of AED in every CSC location.
    3. AEDs shall be maintained in accordance with manufacturer's instructions.

TRAINING

  1. As part of the initial national acquisition of AED devices for all operational sites, first aid and CPR/AED training for Master Instructor shall be deemed as a mandatory requirement.

  2. Following the completion of the Master Instructor training, CSC Master Trainers shall be responsible for providing AED training:

    1. as part of the standard first aid and CPR/AED training;
    2. in accordance with prescribed training plans developed by the Learning and Development Division at National Headquarters.
  3. Certification training shall be conducted in accordance with prescribed training plans developed to reflect National Training Standards.

OPERATIONAL REQUIREMENTS

  1. Since AEDs contribute to optimal pre-hospital emergency care, they have been installed in most sites and offices to promote the health and safety of staff members, offenders and members of the public. These units are mainly stored inside wall mounted cabinets. As well, it may be more convenient to install the wall cabinets beside first aid kits.

  2. The AEDs come with a hardened plastic carrying case that has a clear window on the right front side. The case shall be affixed with a simple security seal so that easy verification of the integrity of the unit can be confirmed. The AED is to be placed in the case with the status indicator visible through the clear window of the case, so the red X or the green " located on the handle of the AED is visible without breaking the seal.

  3. A broken seal indicates previous use or possible tampering. Therefore, the unit needs to be inspected or restocked with consumable supplies.

  4. In addition, if the AED is stored inside a wall cabinet, the cabinet shall also be affixed with a security seal. All sites are responsible for acquiring and installing the security seals, as required.

  5. At the commencement of each shift, AEDs stored in a cabinet or a desk drawer inside the Control Post shall be visually inspected in the same manner as any other security or medical equipment that exists inside the post. This pertains to both security and non-security work stations.

  6. In cases where tampering, damage or malfunction of the AED has been detected in the Control Post, an entry shall be included in the Unit Log Book and the incident will immediately be reported to the Institutional Head, AWMS or delegate. In the case of an office location or Health Centre, it will immediately be reported verbally and/or by email to the Unit Head or Chief of Health Services and subsequently to the AWMS or delegate.

  7. AEDs that are stored inside secured metal wall mounted cabinets shall be visually inspected when the Officer makes his or her rounds in the same manner as he or she would visually inspect any other security equipment such as fire extinguishers or fire hose cabinets. These inspections shall be documented.

  8. In addition, a regular inspection on site or in an office location ensures that the equipment is in a ready state of preparedness. This inspection is to occur with the regular monthly inspection of first aid equipment.

  9. When staff members and trained staff members use the AED, a completed Post-Rescue Medical Report (CSC/SCC 1323-05 or 1323-06) (included at the end of this annex) will be completed and submitted to the Institutional Head, Chief of Health Services or Unit Head. In the institutions, the Officer's Statement/Observation Report (CSC/SCC 0875) will also be completed.

  10. After each use, the Institutional Head or designate shall be responsible for the following:

    1. removing the AED from the unit;
    2. collecting the Officer's Statement/Observation Report (CSC/SCC 0875) and the Post-Rescue Medical Report (CSC/SCC 1323-05 or 1323-06) as outlined in paragraph 41; and
    3. storing the equipment and paperwork in a secure area until the whole package can be provided to the Institutional Head as evidence depending on the incident.
  11. All evidentiary procedures shall apply.

  12. The designated person for the inspection of AEDs shall be advised when an AED has been used.

  13. An outside Medical Director (Doctor) has been retained under a personal service contract for a medical consultative service regarding AED usage, and any other related questions. This service is available through and funded by the Technical Services Branch at National Headquarters. Following AED utilization, the stored information requires a medical consultative analysis. The AED should be properly and securely packaged with the yellow copy of the Post-Rescue Medical Report (CSC/SCC 1323-05 or 1323-06) and couriered within 48 hours of the event to the Medical Director under contract with CSC.

  14. The Medical Director shall download and review the data, inspect the AED to ensure that all servicing requirements are met, and return the unit to CSC in an operational state.

  15. When an AED is shipped outside for an event reading, a CSC replacement unit shall be used until the serviced unit is returned. The AED box should never be left empty.

  16. Institutions and offices have a limited number of back-up units. They are to ensure that fully operational and regularly inspected back-up AEDs are present in all designated areas of the institution or office at all times.

  17. To ensure the safety of persons using the AED device, all manufacturer instructions shall be followed.

  18. All security posts and other designated areas of the CSC facility that may require the use of an AED shall outline procedures for the unit. These procedures shall be stated either in the respective Post Orders, in written operating procedures or in emergency and evacuation plans.

  19. All AED locations shall be clearly identified by the installation of approved AED signs.

CLEANING, MAINTENANCE AND STORAGE

  1. AEDs are to be cleaned, maintained and stored in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions.

  2. Any significant exposure to blood and/or other body fluids will be managed as per Protocol 821-1 - Post-Exposure Protocol (PEP) for Managing Significant Exposure to Blood and/or Body Fluids.

  3. Any cleaning of blood and/or other body fluids will be completed as per Guidelines 821-3 - Cleaning Blood and/or Other Body Fluid Spills.

  4. All AEDs shall be safely stored and secured either inside a metal filing cabinet in the respective work station, if possible, or inside metal wall mounted cabinets strategically located throughout the institution, or in a safe and accessible location.

  5. The AED electrode pads will be replaced after two (2) years or after each usage. The electrode pads are to be used once only. The batteries will be replaced after three (3) years or after each use if required.

AED DATA DOWNLOAD AND MANAGEMENT OF POST-RESCUE MEDICAL REPORT

  1. Following the use of an AED, the Institutional Head or designate will notify the contracted Medical Director via email (henstridge@heartzap.ca) or fax (705-263-3915) that the AED was applied. The Post-Rescue Medical Report (CSC/SCC 1323-05 or 1323-06) will also be completed by or in conjunction with the rescuer.

  2. The Post-Rescue Medical Report (CSC/SCC 1323-05 or 1323-06) may contain sensitive information relating to the condition of the casualty for which the AED was deployed and the data subsequently analyzed. The yellow copy of the Report will not specifically indicate the name or identity of the victim, but will indicate the AED serial number used for the rescue, the date and site of the rescue.

    NOTE:

    • In the case of form CSC/SCC 1323-05, the original copy goes in the offender Health Care File and the yellow detachable copy is sent to the outside Medical Director, along with the AED.
    • In the case of form CSC/SCC 1323-06, the original copy goes in the First Aid Records and the yellow copy goes to the outside Medical Director, along with the AED.
  3. When the AED is used on an inmate/offender, the contact person indicated in the Post-Rescue Medical Report will be the Chief of Health Services or Unit Head. Consequently, the downloaded report will be distributed in a confidential manner to the contact person who will place it in the inmate/offender medical records.

  4. When the AED is used on a staff member or visitor, the contact person will be the Institutional Head or Unit Head. The Post-Rescue Medical Report and downloaded data report are both retained as part of the First Aid Records.

  5. Prior to packaging the AED, the person in charge will:

    1. ensure that the unit is turned off;
    2. remove the used electrode pads;
    3. attach a new set of electrode pads to the AED to prevent the batteries from draining and replace the cover; and
    4. clean the AED.
  6. If the AED malfunctions during a rescue attempt, the person in charge will package the AED "as is" without going through the previous steps.

  7. The AED will be packaged in a suitably sized box and packing material along with the yellow copy of the Post-Rescue Medical Report (CSC/SCC 1323-05 or 1323-06).

  8. The AED will be shipped via courier to:

    • Dr. David Henstridge
    • AED/DEA Data Management Services
    • 751 Main Street East
    • North Bay ON P1B 1C2
  9. The AED will be used only once in order to maintain data integrity. With each usage, the previous data is overwritten.

  10. The AED records information about any rescue attempt in which the AED is activated and applied. The AED model chosen by the CSC does not record voice during a rescue. Information that can be retrieved may include the following:

    1. the time the AED was activated;
    2. the time the pads were attached;
    3. the actual ECG rhythm as recorded by the AED electrodes;
    4. a record of any shocks provided;
    5. the intervals of CPR provided;
    6. a report of the audible or text prompts received by the rescuer; and
    7. the time the AED was turned off.
  11. Upon receiving the AED unit, the contracted Medical Director will download, review and interpret the data for quality assurance reasons. This also includes ensuring the AED performed the appropriate rhythm analysis and functioned properly.

  12. Deficiencies and non-compliance with these guidelines shall be identified and appropriate corrective action taken without delay.

  13. Questions regarding these guidelines shall be directed to the Regional Coordinator of Occupational Health and Safety.

Original signed by:

Fraser Macaulay
Acting Assistant Commissioner
Human Resource Management